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Thread: One Finnish rebreather diver died at Font Estramar, France 10.6.2017

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    One Finnish rebreather diver died at Font Estramar, France 10.6.2017

    The dive team released a report:

    Descripition of a cave dive accident in Font Estramar, France 10.6.2017.

    Team of 5 cave divers from Finland travelled to Southern France for a cave diving holiday. Plan was to spend 2 weeks in the region and dive caves that they had been diving already before.

    9-10.6.2017 plan was to dive Font Estramar cave located in Salses-le-Château. First dive day was a setup day where all safety tanks are installed to the cave and check up for the conditons of water and line system. Second day was supposed to be the deep dive to approx. 200m depth. Team consisted from 2 deep divers, 2 support divers and from one surface person.

    On the setup dive morning of friday 9.6.2017 maximum depth was 160m for the deep team and 70m for the support team. Total of 20 safety tanks were installed to various depths for the next day. Water conditions were good, clear visibility and 18 degree celsius temperature. After the dive, teams rested and started to prepare for next day.

    Saturday 10.6.2017 deep diving team (Divers 1 and 2) started their decent approx. 09:00, during the decent they installed additional back-up rebreather to 100m. When they arrived to 200m depth, Diver 1 heard loud noise behind him, when turning around he saw that scooter of Diver 2 had imploded and was dragging Diver 2 deeper. Scooter is attached to the diver with a pulling cord and a clip, Diver 2 was not releasing the negative scooter and was trying agressively swim up. Diver 1 swam after him to help and was able to cut the towing cord in 214m depth and they stopped decending, imploded scooted continued to decend. Visibility went very bad during this event and divers had to look for the lost guide line, during their search they found themself in a dead end. After a quick search Diver 1 found the guide line and was able to help Diver 2 also to the line, but Diver 2 already suffered from reduced ability to work. Soon the situation escaled when Diver 2 got stuck on the loose guide lines. Diver 1 tried to cut the guide lines and told Diver 2 to calm dow, but he was already suffering from reduced level of consciousness and very soon he went unconscious. Diver 1 could not any more help his friend and was forced to leave in order to save himself.

    Diver 1 started his decompression from 130m and total deco load was 450min at this point. Safety divers started their dive 100min after the deep team start, and when meeting Diver 1, they received the information what had happened. Diver 1 was escorted to shallow water and kept under a surveillance during the decompression. Message about the accident was brought up and surface person made the emergency call. Police and Fire department arrived before Diver 1 was surfaced and fire department divers took the safety diver responsibility for the rest of the decompression. Diver 1 finally surfaced after 500min of dive time in good physical health.

    Investigation of the accident is now done by French military police, Gendarmerie.

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    Re: One Finnish rebreather diver died at Font Estramar, France 10.6.2017

    Not sure why this did not post on main forum.

  3. #3
    So many CCR So little etc Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase's Avatar
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    Re: One Finnish rebreather diver died at Font Estramar, France 10.6.2017

    Quote Originally Posted by dreamdive  View Original Post
    Not sure why this did not post on main forum.
    Who cares

    How very sad and what a brave attempt to save him.

    Its so rare we get detailed accident reports like this and its greatly appreciated

    I am 100% sure it will make people think about how they manage diving with scooters at great depth from now on. Maybe one day this will save a life.

    Mark

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    RBW Member dreamdive has disabled reputation dreamdive's Avatar
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    Re: One Finnish rebreather diver died at Font Estramar, France 10.6.2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Chase  View Original Post
    Who cares

    How very sad and what a brave attempt to save him.

    Its so rare we get detailed accident reports like this and its greatly appreciated

    I am 100% sure it will make people think about how they manage diving with scooters at great depth from now on. Maybe one day this will save a life.

    Mark
    Another view taken from this is: NEVER UNDERESTIMATE CO2! And I am not talking about the rebreather not managing it. I am talking about increased WOB at depth due to work load and gas densities not allowing for CO2 generated to be exhaled and thus scrubbed.

    I recommend for people to look at Simon Mitchell's lecture again as a reminder.

    C

  5. #5
    Just add ice & water plazma is a name known to all plazma is a name known to all plazma is a name known to all plazma is a name known to all plazma is a name known to all plazma is a name known to all plazma is a name known to all plazma is a name known to all plazma is a name known to all plazma is a name known to all plazma is a name known to all plazma's Avatar
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    Re: One Finnish rebreather diver died at Font Estramar, France 10.6.2017

    Translation of a message from an other forum:
    The team hired by the SSF under judicial requisition finished its mission yesterday. Frédéric Swierczynski reached the depth of 234 meters in Font Estramar to find the body of the disappeared diver. He made a video and retrieved the victim's computer to hand them over to the judicial authorities.
    The operation lasted four days in order to equip the cavity with a safety line sized according to the planned dives. It was managed mainly by Fabrice Fillol (CTDS66) and Laurent Chalvet (TRSP).
    We have to regret a minor accident. One of the divers fell on a portage and injured his hand with the need for two stitches.

    The prosecutor requested a feasibility study for the extraction of the body and the equipment. In view of the risks involved, all the participants refused to undertake such an operation.

  6. #6
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    Re: One Finnish rebreather diver died at Font Estramar, France 10.6.2017

    Quote Originally Posted by dreamdive  View Original Post
    Another view taken from this is: NEVER UNDERESTIMATE CO2! And I am not talking about the rebreather not managing it. I am talking about increased WOB at depth due to work load and gas densities not allowing for CO2 generated to be exhaled and thus scrubbed.

    I recommend for people to look at Simon Mitchell's lecture again as a reminder.

    C
    Mitchell's lecture is very thorough and I too would look at it you have not already

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