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Thread: Jacques Vert Plonger Extrodiair

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    Jacques Vert Plonger Extrodiair


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    Jacques Vert Plonger Extrodiair

    The Original Battle of the Atlantic
    Scott McWilliam
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    Last edited by s. McWilliam; 2nd December 2014 at 19:20.

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    Re: Jacques Vert Plonger Extrodiair

    Some of the earliest accounts of diving on the great lakes.
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    Re: Jacques Vert Plonger Extrodiair

    THE PERFECT GIFT FOR THE DIVER WHO HAS EVERYTHING!.
    (and is still doing it all wrong)
    DIVING
    With & Without Armor:
    THE EXPLOITS OF THE
    CELEBRATED SUBMARINE DIVER
    J.B. GREEN
     
    Contains Valuable Information
    on:
    Floating. (who needs a B.C.?)
    Swimming. (forget about the Y.)
    Scientific Diving. (even neater than tec diving)
    Who makes good Divers? (you'll never look at your dive buddy the same way.)
    How to revive near drown persons. (who needs C.P.R.?)
    Diving Operations on the Shipwreck Atlantic. (way before the court injunction.)
    Caverns in the bottom of the lakes. (cave divers love to tell stories.)
    Diving in the West Indies. (for the diver who likes to go south in the winter.)
    Blasting Rocks Underwater. (before the E.P.A.)
    Different kinds of Apparatus for Diving. (why go to the dive shop when you can build your own?)
    "Well worth the trifling expense of this little volume." J.B.G. 1859
    Last edited by s. McWilliam; 2nd December 2014 at 18:12.

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    Re: Jacques Vert Plonger Extrodiair

    DIVING
    With & Without Armor:
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    CONTAINING THE
    SUBMARINE EXPLOITS
    OF
    J. B. GREEN
    THE CELEBRATED SUBMARINE DIVER




    BUFFALO
    FAXTONS STEAM POWERED PRESS No. 33 MAIN STREET

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    Re: Jacques Vert Plonger Extrodiair

    Entered According to Act of Congress 1859 by

    JOHN B. GREEN
    In the Clerks Office of the District Court of the United States for the Northern
    district of New York.

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    Re: Jacques Vert Plonger Extrodiair

    WORDS PRELIMINARY
     
     
     
     
     
    The contents of the following pages which I now present to the public, embrace the whole period in which I was engaged in diving, both with and with- out submarine armor, and contains much that was omitted in my former edition. I have taken prudence as my guide in narrating each incident, and condensed what is sufficient for hundreds of pages, into this pamphlet. Thus, I have merely given facts, and left the reader to use his own judge-ment in forming theories. This perhaps, is the bet-ter way, for books which are filled with specula-tions too often cast a shadow over that part of their pages which are true and really useful.
    The readiness with which I disposed of my first edition, notwithstanding the small amount of matter it contained, convinces me that there is not a small portion of the community that feels no little interest in the subject of which I have endeavored to give a slight history; and which cost me my health, and made me a cripple for life. There is not a hope that I will ever recover.
    I am no less aware of that assistance which I have received from friends and well-wishers, in the sale of my little book: which, as I cannot hope to return to my former occupation, is all my worldly goods, and store with which, to journey on, a cripple, through the world. I cannot express my heart-felt thankfulness for the most trifling aid.
    I have endeavored to give in the following pages only facts such as will be of value not only to di-vers but others: among which are suggestions in regard to floating, which may save more than one reader from a watery grave, and which at least will repay the reader for the trifling expense he has incurred for this little volume.

     
     
     
     
     

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    Re: Jacques Vert Plonger Extrodiair

     
     
    DIVING
    OR
    SUBMARINE EXPLORATIONS.
    _________
    CHAPTER I
    The Birth Place-Early Years, how spent-Moves to Ogdens burg-Learns to Swim-Removes thence to Oswego. Progress in Swimming-First sees Diving for Property.
    Before entering upon that part of my life which is connected with the use of Submarine diving: perhaps a hasty sketch of my early life, and particularly, that con-
    nected with diving, will not be uninteresting, even, to the hasty reader. In this and a few of the succeeding chapters will be found a brief capitulation of that experience given, I trust, in as short a space as the various events will allow.
    I was born near the city of Montreal, Canada East, in the year 1826. My parents emigrated to the Province from France at quite an early period, and settled upon a small farm near that City. It was there that my early days were spent--spent as farmers boys, as well as others, too often spend their time, neglecting to store their minds with that useful knowledge and learning, which will fit them for the dutics of life, no matter what avocation or profession they may choose to follow. And, although, my profession, if I may so term my business, may seem to require little but mere physical endurance; yet, I must assure the reader that I feel very keenly my inability, to present and describe it minutely, and intelligibly. Were I able so to do, I am quite sure I would convince the reader that there is much of science and art about submarine operations. And even with my present attempt, I hope to be able to banish from the mind of any reader that impression, if he entertains such a predilection in regard to the subject.
    I remained in Canada until 1835, when my father removed to Ogdensburg, New York, where he continued his former occupation; and I remained with him, working on the new homestead. Our new farm was situated near the river St. Lawrence, and it was in the waters of this noble river that I first learned to swim. I mastered the art with more than ordinary ease; and I once practiced it to perfection; and in another part of this little work, will be found a description of that experience, , which I had tested for years.
    I can say with confidence, that whoever follows those rules, will be able to swim; and in case of accident requiring it, to remain upon the surface of the water for hours. and removed to Oswego and engaged in mercantile business. In that locality I had ample opportunity to indulge my propensity for swimming by often bathing in the deep waters of Lake Ontario. I became so perfected in the art, that I could swim miles; and in the harbor at Oswego, I first began diving for lost property, and human bodies.

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    Re: Jacques Vert Plonger Extrodiair

    CHAPTER II
    The First Diving for property-Success-The idea of a future employment-The resolve to adopt Submarine Wrecking.
    It was in the spring of 1841, as I was walking leisurely along the dock in Oswego, that I first saw diving for lost property. Two men were plunging to the bottom of Oswego River for a box of soap and a clock-two articles which had been stolen and thrown into the water. As the weather was fine and diving a sport in which I greatly delighted, I at once decided to try my art in the search. I devested myself of my garments, and dove for the bottom of the river. I sank about fifteen feet-half way- when I began to feel a little timid, and I instantly rose to the surface of the water. I again observed with what ease and apparent unconcern, the divers sank even to the bottom of the river; and decided not to be out-done in my favorite sport, and I plunged down again, and swam to the bottom; and with me as I returned to the surface, I brought a bar of soap, the box having been broken.
    Encouraged by the prize, though, simple, I continued diving with renewed vigor, and was soon rewarded by finding the clock; and in doing so, my last submersion lasted one minute and a-half, longer time than I ever remained under water before. To the spectators on the wharf it seemed I had strangled, and in my desperation clung to some protruding object below the surface of the water.
    Elated by this success, I at once conceived the idea of following diving for property as a vocation; and during the same season, I recovered large quantities of freight, which had been lost in the harbor and lake about Oswego; the sale of which was so remunerative, that I resolved to follow Submarine Wrecking in the future, as a business.
    _______________

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    Re: Jacques Vert Plonger Extrodiair

    CHAPTER III
    Familiarity with the lake and harbor about Oswego - The First Diving for a Human Body - Why persons do not rise when Drowning - Recovers the Bodies of a Family of Six - "Such Sights" - The rescue of a lady from a Watery Grave - The Recovery - How to restore Persons apparently drown - Experience of the Lady while drowning - The Rescue of a man in Albany - Strange so many cannot swim.
    By the fall of 1841, I had become familiar with the bottom of Oswego river and also that of the lake bordering Oswego, for I had recovered property in almost every locality, and had dove in many more.
    And it was at this date that I was first called upon to search for a more precious freight than I had ever before, in the hasty conception and adoption of my profession conceive of undertaking to rescue,-it was the body of a fellow being. A boy of about sixteen years, had fallen from a canal boat the day previous, and his body could not
    be found. I at once, on hearing of the accident, undertook the search. After diving several times, but, without success, I at last found the body. The hands were griping a stick of protruding timber at the bottom of the river. It was with much effort that I released their hold.
    The position of the body will account for so many persons failing to rise, after they sink beneath the surface of the water. In all cases with which I have been acquainted, this has been the sole cause of their not rising at least, three times.
    In the summer of 1844, I was again called to preform a like office. I dove for the bodies of a Norwegian family of six in number, who were drowned from capsizing of a small craft as she was leaving the harbor at Oswego. The roughness of the water at the time rendered it imposible to save them, or to raise the bodies of the unfortunate family. I first brought up the father and two children , whom I found partly under a projecting rock at the bottom of the river. One child was clinging around her father's neck, and the other to one of his arms. A short time after, I recovered the mother and two remaining children-one in her arms, and the other clinging to her dress.
    These two groups presented "such sights" as I never wish to behold again, and yet the bystanders looked up on those dead parents each with two children clinging to them; to the father the elder, and to the mother the younger children-each gazer exclaimed "they did not desert their children." The scene had a look about it which must have been a consolation even to the dead.
    Early in the spring of 1845 , I again dove for a body. It was that of a sailor who was struck overboard from a schooner as she was making the port of Oswego. This was
    an arduous task. The water was chilly at the time, and the precise locality where he was lost was not known. I did not find it for days, although I dove for it in many places.
    As I was about to leave Ogdensburg for Oswego, in the steamer "Lady of the Lake," in the latter part of August, my services were unexpectedly demanded to save a young lady from a watery grave.
    At the moment the steamer was to leave her dock, a gentleman with his wife and daughter, a young lady of some sixteen years came up wishing to take passage. The after gang plank had been taken in, and they were obliged to run to the fore one, which they did in time for the man and his wife to pass on board; but, as the daughter was on the plank, it slipped, throwing her into the river, and she sank at once, and did not rise. The cry of "a woman over board," was raised in all parts of the ship, and along the wharf. I rushed to the spot, and, without divesting myself of clothing, plunged into the water. I went to the bottom of the river, but could not see the object of my search, and I arose empty handed. All was now confusion, Parents entreating, all advising, but none doing. I went down again, but with no better success. All now supposed that she had been killed by the revolving wheel, and had of course sunk to rise no more. I again dove, but rose with the same result. But I did not give up the search; and on going down a fifth time, I found her some distance down the current from where the boat lay, clinging to a snag at the bottom of the river. I unclasped her hold, and brought her apparently lifeless form to the surface of the water. It was at once seen that she had escaped the wheel unharmed. She had been in the water some eight or nine minutes; but by the following treatment she was sufficiently restored to converse, in less than a half hour.
    We at once removed the wet clothing, wiped the body dry, placed it in warm blankets and rubbed gently with warm cloths, especially her feet, armpits and stomach, and some one frequently blew into her mouth to excite breathing.*
     
    __________________________________________________

    *The common idea, that persons in drowning are suffocated by taking water into the lungs instead of air is incorrect, and causes the common but dangerous practice, of placing the body downwards to let the water run out, should never be practiced.
    The real cause of death, is the exclusion of air from the lungs; by which
    the proper aeration of the venous blood is prevented, and, consequently the
    circulation through the arterial system, while the pulmonary veins
    ceases to convey oxygenated blood to the heart. Therefore the vital pune-
    tures and heart rapidly extinguish; so that in four or five minutes after air has
    been cut off life is extinguished; although, life has been restored after fifteen or twenty minute submersions, and after perfect insensibility. But it was done
    by long and skilful exertion.

    The great object in restoring persons apparently drown is, "to restore animal heart. For this purpose wet clothes must be removed without delay and the body, after being wiped dry placed in a warm bed or blankets or if possible it should secure warm air baths. In either case the heat should be first moderate gradually increased. Bottles of hot water should be placed at the feet and armpits and a warming pan or heated bricks should be gently passed over the body, or gentle friction exercised with other warm sub
    stances. Meanwhile continued, though gentle attempts should be made to excite breathing artificially, such as blowing in the mouth. If a machine be at hand, slight shocks of electricity, should be kept up at the same time. If there be any signs of remaining life, such as sighing, and convulsive twitching a vein may be opened. The throat may be tickled to excite a propensity to vomit and a teaspoon of warm water administered to test the powers of swallowing. If it resists, a table spoonful of diluted wine or brandy may be given.

    * Even if signs of life are discovered this treatment must be vigorously followed for three or four hours.
    __________________________________________________ __________________

    Signs of life was first discovered by a faint twitching under the chin, as if the stomach was irritated. In a few moments the water spouted from her mouth, and shortly after she spoke, so as to be understood.*
    After the lady had so far recovered as to converse with those around, she related her sensations as she was apparently drowning. She stated, that after she first went down and a momentary horror of death, and a thought of her parents, although she was aware she could not breath, she felt no pain whatever - that she felt very comfortable - and as she lay there beneath the water, she saw the sun in the heavens above, and its appearance was that of a great ball of fire, but without any dazzling, or blaze, and, as consciousness gradually past away, that ball of fire grew less and less brilliant, until it finally went out, like a lingering spark of fire, on a half extinguished candle.
    My second timely effort to save a fellow being from drowning, was in Albany, the ensuing season. As I was standing on the bankof the Hudson river, at a place, admiring the varied prospect around me, I observed a person fall from a canal boat into the water. I hurried to the rescue-, but as I swam near the drowning man, I saw it was not prudent to come within his reach, as he was a large man and floundered desperately for life, I knew that something must be done, and that immediately. I awaited my opportune and gave him a blow behind the ear- which, I must say, stretched him floating. I then brought him to the boat and he was taken on board he soon recovered.
    I have given this last occurrence to show the value of knowing how to swim. I-had the subject of this accident but he had known how to practice the art of swimming he would have rescued himself with the greatest ease. And, had I not been familiar- with the art myself, he would, in all probability, have drowned.
    It often appears strange to me, that such a proportion of community know nothing of the art of buoying themselves on the water -an art which requires only presence of mind to enable one to follow nature . All the dumb animals can swim, it is well
    known, and why? Because they simply endeavor to navigate in the water as they do upon land. If persons in the water would simply do this, they would find themselves buoyed sufficiently to lift the mouth above the surface of the water.
    __________________________________________________ _
    *I should here say the father, with a generosity equal to his means made me the handsome present of five hundred dollars for my timely efforts in saving his daughter.
    __________________________________________________ _____________


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