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Thread: DIY temp stick.

  1. #31
    Darlene Starr - DIY Diva Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen's Avatar
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    So I've been playing about with this tempstik idea a bit with the few DS1820's that I have on hand, and I'm curious enough to expand on it a bit.

    So far I'm still using a 4X20 Lcd display and haven't started working with a graphics lcd yet. As much as I wanted to keep it external, I thought up a way to put it in the scrubber and not have a leak issue, so I've gained some enthusiazm.

    Anyway, ... I just ordered 50 of the DS18B20's which is way more than I need, but the price break for that quantity was most attractive.

    If anyone else is playing about with this tempstik thing, and needs some sensors, let me know.


    Darlene

  2. #32
    Darlene Starr - DIY Diva Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen's Avatar
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Update:


    I finally got around to playing with my new supply of sensors.

    I made up a "test" pcb with 10 sensors over a 9 inch space, with an eleventh sensor at the very end under the connector plug as a reference.

    Each sensor displays in celsius, so the temps will always be 2 digits or less, important for how it's being displayed. ... Actually, it's programmed to always display 2 digits, so 0 to 9 display as 00 to 09.

    When each of the sensors is within a small error range of the reference, it displays the temp on the bottom row.

    If the sensor is more significantly below ref, it displays the less-than symbol " << " instead of digits.

    As the sensor temp rises, the temp then displays on the next row(s) up, while displaying " II " on row(s) below.

    Overall, it gives a reasonable approximation of a bar graph, while also displaying the actual temp.

    I have fairly small temp increments between rows to facillitate testing, but that's a quick code edit to change.

    Here's a few pics to show how it displays; I pointed a hair dryer at it for a moment to show how it works.

    In a scrubber environment, I'd expect the curve to be a bit "narrower".


    Darlene
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    Last edited by Scuba_Vixen; 18th November 2009 at 15:09.

  3. #33
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scuba_Vixen  View Original Post
    Update:


    I finally got around to playing with my new supply of sensors.

    I made up a "test" pcb with 10 sensors over a 9 inch space, with an eleventh sensor at the very end under the connector plug as a reference.

    Each sensor displays in celsius, so the temps will always be 2 digits or less, important for how it's being displayed. ... Actually, it's programmed to always display 2 digits, so 0 to 9 display as 00 to 09.

    When each of the sensors is within a small error range of the reference, it displays the temp on the bottom row.

    If the sensor is more significantly below ref, it displays the less-than symbol " << " instead of digits.

    As the sensor temp rises, the temp then displays on the next row(s) up, while displaying " II " on row(s) below.

    Overall, it gives a reasonable approximation of a bar graph, while also displaying the actual temp.

    I have fairly small temp increments between rows to facillitate testing, but that's a quick code edit to change.

    Here's a few pics to show how it displays; I pointed a hair dryer at it for a moment to show how it works.

    In a scrubber environment, I'd expect the curve to be a bit "narrower".


    Darlene

    Darlene

    well done have some green for that

    Do you reckon that you can mount this external onto the canister ?

  4. #34
    Darlene Starr - DIY Diva Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen's Avatar
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Quote Originally Posted by divelermentov  View Original Post
    Darlene

    well done have some green for that

    Do you reckon that you can mount this external onto the canister ?


    That was my original thought, ... mostly because I didn't want to have holes that might be leak points in my scrubber. It would have, on the downside, been a serious compromise in responsiveness.

    After giving it more thought however, I think that it would be possible to put a M8 receptacle in the spigot that connects the scrubber to the exhale bag. This is a seperate part from the scrubber housing, and already has a QC fitting for the O2 addition, so it's stout enough to drill and tap and pretty well solves the potential leak point issue.

    Tecme part P0050 on this page is the part I have now: Tec Equipment für Nitrox, Rebreather Höhlen Tauchen
    It seems suitable for adding a connector, though I could make a new one if need be.

    The wires would run internally, and there would be a cordset from the display unit to plug in at the scrubber.

    Set up like that, I could have 10 sensors in the scrubber bed, and have the reference sensor in the scrubber head, just before the bed.

    It'a all still a work in progress, but it does seem do-able.


    Darlene
    Last edited by Scuba_Vixen; 18th November 2009 at 22:18.

  5. #35
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    I have done this a number of times.

    I much prefer bargraphs over numbers but I do like Darlene's hybrid graph.

    I would go with a minimum of 5 sensors. One at the top, one at the bottom and the rest evenly spaced in between. 9 sensors divides the scrubber in 1/8 ths.

    No ambient sensor. Use the first one for baseline. Insulation around the scrubber makes the actual ambient unimportant.

    It is possible to do this in analog. I used National bargraph ICs with 90% of the first sensor buffered as REF low for all bar graphs and a fixed REF high.

  6. #36
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    this was my thinking as well,
    analog and external would be the preferred options as you could keep it very small and compact and more or less fail proofe

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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    very clean Darlene, have some green.
    Still envious of your talent!

    Cheers,
    Hunter

  8. #38
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Very cool and way above my ability to do.

  9. #39
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Nice work, well beyond my ability. Interesting display idea.

    re the comments on analogue, if you see the earlier part of the discussion you can see that we went over that

    I don't know how this one works but it seems to have just 3 wires to the sensors. I presume each sensor is coded or something like that.

  10. #40
    Darlene Starr - DIY Diva Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen's Avatar
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scubascooby  View Original Post
    Nice work, well beyond my ability. Interesting display idea.

    re the comments on analogue, if you see the earlier part of the discussion you can see that we went over that

    I don't know how this one works but it seems to have just 3 wires to the sensors. I presume each sensor is coded or something like that.

    Correct;
    Each sensor has a unique digital identifier hardcoded into it at manufacture. It's 64 binary digits (0's and 1's) which can be more easily written as eight, 2 digit hex (base 16) pairs

    Before you can use the sensors in a circuit, (ie: if I was to replace one that's there already or add more)

    You need to individually put them into a circuit with a program designed to have the sensor give you its identifier. (called the ROM ID)

    The commands are simple, but formatting the returned data is the challenge:
    OWOUT DS1820pin,OW_FERst,[ReadROM]
    OWIN DS1820pin,OW_BERst,[STR romData\8]

    Once you have the ROM ID of all your sensors, and kept track of which sensor goes to which ID#, you can put them into a multi-sensor circuit. You need to know which sensor goes to which ID so that you can access the sensors in the correct sequential order.

    To use them in a program with multiple sensors, you create a data table of the ROM ID's. This is a portion of the ID table for my sensors; the $ indicates that it's in hexadecimal (base 16) notice it's in eight 2 digit pairs. It's done this way since 2 hex digits is 8 binary bits (digits) and that's a byte, which is an easy way to handle data.

    Temp1 DATA $28, $E5, $74, $48, $02, $00, $00, $1D
    Temp2 DATA $28, $1C, $B3, $48, $02, $00, $00, $8A
    Temp3 DATA $28, $F2, $8F, $48, $02, $00, $00, $15
    Temp4 DATA $28, $C1, $B1, $48, $02, $00, $00, $87

    To read any given sensor, you use a command (MatchRom) that specifies the ID of the sensor you want, and the command for the function you want the sensor to execute which is a 2 step process. Step 1 tells the sensor to convert temp, and step 2 is to read the temp from the sensor's memory.


    As you can see from the pics, from a hardware perspective, it doesn't get much simpler.

    3 wires to the sensor string
    3 wires to the lcd display
    1 resistor
    1 microcontroller



    Darlene
    Last edited by Scuba_Vixen; 19th November 2009 at 12:43.

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