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Thread: Hypercapnia detection post mortem?

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    RBW Member MatV is a jewel in the rough MatV is a jewel in the rough MatV is a jewel in the rough MatV is a jewel in the rough MatV is a jewel in the rough MatV is a jewel in the rough MatV is a jewel in the rough MatV's Avatar
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    Hypercapnia detection post mortem?

    Can it be done?
    While filing through the relevant threads I noticed there seems to be no fixed protocols how to evaluate the state of a rebreather being part in an accident, and it's possible role herein.

    Till proof of the contrary, I assume the same for post mortems of rebreather divers.

    There should be an automatism to search for signs of hypercapnia, and other reasons for cardiac arrest apart from the obvious like coronary infarcts, left chamber insufficiency, lung edema.

    Same automatism is needed for analising the rig, suit, circumstances. Are there any signs of scrubber overuse, high WOB, high air flow velocity, possibility of scrubber bypassing, design faults enabling this.

    Just my 2 cc, still looking for some more spiccioli

    Matthias

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    a work in progress... rewrites has a spectacular aura about rewrites has a spectacular aura about rewrites has a spectacular aura about rewrites has a spectacular aura about rewrites has a spectacular aura about rewrites has a spectacular aura about rewrites's Avatar
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    Re: Hypercapnia detection post mortem?

    PaCo2 is going to be raised in examination post mortem as the majority of deceased divers will have died from drowning.

    Trying to distinguish the primary cause of hypercapnia (increased WOB, contaminants, loss of gas, etc.) from that caused by drowning (secondary) is almost impossible in the post mortem fatality, I imagine. However, I'm not a pathologist.

    My understanding is that equipment inspection and witness testimony are better indicators of possible fatal hypercapnia than post mortem examination.

    PH

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    RBW Member SteveJ is a jewel in the rough SteveJ is a jewel in the rough SteveJ is a jewel in the rough SteveJ is a jewel in the rough SteveJ is a jewel in the rough SteveJ is a jewel in the rough SteveJ is a jewel in the rough SteveJ's Avatar
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    Re: Hypercapnia detection post mortem?

    Quote Originally Posted by rewrites  View Original Post
    PaCo2 is going to be raised in examination post mortem as the majority of deceased divers will have died from drowning.

    Trying to distinguish the primary cause of hypercapnia (increased WOB, contaminants, loss of gas, etc.) from that caused by drowning (secondary) is almost impossible in the post mortem fatality, I imagine. However, I'm not a pathologist.

    My understanding is that equipment inspection and witness testimony are better indicators of possible fatal hypercapnia than post mortem examination.

    PH
    ...and, the importance of trying to learn from the non-fatal accidents.

    Steve

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