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Thread: Sharks

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    RBW Member lowlifeshoots is an unknown quantity at this point lowlifeshoots's Avatar
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    Sharks

    Hello all. I'm a new O2ptima diver, got trained in October have about 25 hours on the unit. I have definitely noticed marine life being more interested in me since I've gone silent. Until yesterday I've always had an OC buddy with me. Yesterday I did 2 solo dives on the reef and on both dives in different sites I had a reef shark be overly interested in me. The 2nd sight it was about a 4 footer that circled me for over 5 minutes. I'm used to seeing them on OC and they will pass by without a second look. Has anyone else had this experience. Was doing photography not spearing or harvesting anything to interest the shark.

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    Re: Sharks

    Quote Originally Posted by lowlifeshoots  View Original Post
    Hello all. I'm a new O2ptima diver, got trained in October have about 25 hours on the unit. I have definitely noticed marine life being more interested in me since I've gone silent. Until yesterday I've always had an OC buddy with me. Yesterday I did 2 solo dives on the reef and on both dives in different sites I had a reef shark be overly interested in me. The 2nd sight it was about a 4 footer that circled me for over 5 minutes. I'm used to seeing them on OC and they will pass by without a second look. Has anyone else had this experience. Was doing photography not spearing or harvesting anything to interest the shark.
    Yes, all the time. It’s one of the main reasons I dive CCR. I have spent lots of time in the water with sharks, lots of it by myself. It is important to remember that shark behavior is fairly predictable and that as long as you have something behind you, like the reef or a wreck, they are much less likely to attack you. They are ambush predators and always looking for an advantage, so don’t give them one. The one place I would never want to be is in the open water at night doing an ascent in a remote location. As long as you have the reef at your back you will almost certainly be fine. I have been bumped by sharks, but only when I wasn’t paying attention or during a shark calling exercise, where they came in too fast and ran into me, probably by accident. On one occasion when I was bumped and wasn’t paying attention, I simply pushed back and the shark took off and did not return. It is my opinion that when sharks hang around, they are just very curious about what may appear to them to be a large competing predator. Sometimes it takes the form of a threat display with arched back and pectoral fins down, sometimes they just circle for a long time until they are satisfied you arent a threat and move on. A lot of it is body language, as I alluded to above. I think you are more likely to get attacked if you are unaware of their presence or doing something which appears Aggressive to them. It is not a surprise to me that videographers in the Galapagos are routinely bumped hard by big Galapagos sharks because they are constantly sticking their camera apparatus out in front of them and swimming towards the sharks. Conversely I have seen one of the most experienced divers I’ve ever known roll over on his side like a puppy in order to keep a big silvertip hanging around longer, the opposite of a threat display, an act of submission. The shark had obviously never seen humans before as we were hundreds of miles from land and it worked, the animal swam around us leisurely for a few more minutes. They are fascinating creatures and I have rarely felt scared in their presence...
    Last edited by silent running; 6th January 2019 at 01:02.

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    Re: Sharks

    Quote Originally Posted by silent running  View Original Post
    Yes, all the time. Itís one of the main reasons I dive CCR. I have spent lots of time in the water with sharks, lots of it by myself. It is important to remember that shark behavior is fairly predictable and that as long as you have something behind you, like the reef or a wreck, they are much less likely to attack you. They are ambush predators and always looking for an advantage, so donít give them one. The one place I would never want to be is in the open water at night doing an ascent in a remote location. As long as you have the reef at your back you will almost certainly be fine. I have been bumped by sharks, but only when I wasnít paying attention or during a shark calling exercise, where they came in too fast and ran into me, probably by accident. On one occasion when I was bumped and wasnít paying attention, I simply pushed back and the shark took off and did not return. It is my opinion that when sharks hang around, they are just very curious about what may appear to them to be a large competing predator. Sometimes it takes the form of a threat display with arched back and pectoral fins down, sometimes they just circle for a long time until they are satisfied you arent a threat and move on. A lot of it is body language, as I alluded to above. I think you are more likely to get attacked if you are unaware of their presence or doing something which appears Aggressive to them. It is not a surprise to me that videographers in the Galapagos are routinely bumped hard by big Galapagos sharks because they are constantly sticking their camera apparatus out in front of them and swimming towards the sharks. Conversely I have seen one of the most experienced divers Iíve ever known roll over on his side like a puppy in order to keep a big silvertip hanging around longer, the opposite of a threat display, an act of submission. The shark had obviously never seen humans before as we were hundreds of miles from land and it worked, the animal swam around us leisurely for a few more minutes. They are fascinating creatures and I have rarely felt scared in their presence...

    Great Post!
    Chett. L

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    RBW Member sonarmike is an unknown quantity at this point sonarmike's Avatar
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    Re: Sharks

    Thanks for sharing..

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    New Rebreather Diver RoyJN is an unknown quantity at this point RoyJN's Avatar
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    Re: Sharks

    In Monterey/Carmel Bay, when I'm diving with CCR people, the animals tend to be a lot closer. The last dive, my buddies and I did a tech deco dive and the school of fishes were just in front of us hanging out. It went from cool to the feeling of, they're everywhere as they were hanging out right next to us. And yeah, we did see a lot of pelagic fishes including sharks swimming by rather closer then before too.

  6. #6
    Mature mouth breather silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running's Avatar
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    Re: Sharks

    Quote Originally Posted by RoyJN  View Original Post
    In Monterey/Carmel Bay, when I'm diving with CCR people, the animals tend to be a lot closer. The last dive, my buddies and I did a tech deco dive and the school of fishes were just in front of us hanging out. It went from cool to the feeling of, they're everywhere as they were hanging out right next to us. And yeah, we did see a lot of pelagic fishes including sharks swimming by rather closer then before too.
    Hi Roy, what species of sharks do see in Carmel Bay?

  7. #7
    RBW Member lowlifeshoots is an unknown quantity at this point lowlifeshoots's Avatar
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    Re: Sharks

    Quote Originally Posted by silent running  View Original Post
    Yes, all the time. Itís one of the main reasons I dive CCR. I have spent lots of time in the water with sharks, lots of it by myself. It is important to remember that shark behavior is fairly predictable and that as long as you have something behind you, like the reef or a wreck, they are much less likely to attack you. They are ambush predators and always looking for an advantage, so donít give them one. The one place I would never want to be is in the open water at night doing an ascent in a remote location. As long as you have the reef at your back you will almost certainly be fine. I have been bumped by sharks, but only when I wasnít paying attention or during a shark calling exercise, where they came in too fast and ran into me, probably by accident. On one occasion when I was bumped and wasnít paying attention, I simply pushed back and the shark took off and did not return. It is my opinion that when sharks hang around, they are just very curious about what may appear to them to be a large competing predator. Sometimes it takes the form of a threat display with arched back and pectoral fins down, sometimes they just circle for a long time until they are satisfied you arent a threat and move on. A lot of it is body language, as I alluded to above. I think you are more likely to get attacked if you are unaware of their presence or doing something which appears Aggressive to them. It is not a surprise to me that videographers in the Galapagos are routinely bumped hard by big Galapagos sharks because they are constantly sticking their camera apparatus out in front of them and swimming towards the sharks. Conversely I have seen one of the most experienced divers Iíve ever known roll over on his side like a puppy in order to keep a big silvertip hanging around longer, the opposite of a threat display, an act of submission. The shark had obviously never seen humans before as we were hundreds of miles from land and it worked, the animal swam around us leisurely for a few more minutes. They are fascinating creatures and I have rarely felt scared in their presence...
    Thank you for the great response. I usually do keep my back to either the reef or the wreck and when spearing on OC I've often gone inside the wreck to lose sharks. The first site I was in a large sand channel and put myself close to one side and the shark circled in front of me in what seemed like curiosity which I was comfortable with. The 2nd site however I was off the main portion of the reef in sporadic coral heads and soft corals with nothing to back up against. The shark seemed to me to be more than just curious as it circled for over 5 minutes and multiple times swam away to the edge of sight distance then back towards me veering off within a few feet and circling. I just stayed low to the bottom and helicopter turned to keep the shark in front of me as it circled and kept the camera between me and the shark. At the end of the day the shark ended up swimming away and I finished the rest of my dive relatively uneventfully. However the proximity and duration were a little unnerving. I'm sure as it happens more I will become more used to it, but the adjustment from OC and sharks wanting nothing to do with me was rather abrupt.

  8. #8
    RBW Member Dive Africa is an unknown quantity at this point Dive Africa's Avatar
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    Re: Sharks

    We often, on long deco dives, get a number of different sharks:

    - The Tiger's sort of circle for a minute and then leave.

    - Juvenile Bull sharks often do little mock charges - a purge of a regulator (bailout) normally let them leave.

    - The Great whites leave after a swim by cause the don't like the smell of me sh!tting my suite.

    most other sharks - that we encounter don't really care (other than Oceanic White Tips which I find is very curious )

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