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Thread: Hypercapnia lessons learned

  1. #21
    RBW Member broncobowsher is on a distinguished road broncobowsher is on a distinguished road broncobowsher's Avatar
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    Re: Hypercapnia lessons learned

    Good reading. As a super novice rebreather diver it is good to see that the training actually has meaning and works. Thank you for sharing.

  2. #22
    RBW Member mick4707 is an unknown quantity at this point mick4707's Avatar
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    Re: Hypercapnia lessons learned

    Might not be the scrubber but a WOB CO2 retention issue due to the heavy workload. Good job on staying calm

  3. #23
    Mature mouth breather silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running has a reputation beyond repute silent running's Avatar
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    Angry Re: Hypercapnia lessons learned

    Hello TCVA, thanks for posting and glad to hear you were able to manage a tough situation. IMHO, there is more to this than a partially used scrubber. I once spent 30 minutes clawing my way up rock by rock from 200' in a strong tidal down current with a 6lb radial scrubber in its 9th hr with no sign of breakthrough. I should add that when diving in the tropics I do 7-10hrs, workload and depth dependent. So I have been near the end of a scrubber and had to work hard for one reason or another many times with no issues.

    More on WOB, considering BMCLs only breathe best in one position, I'd guess the increased work and hydrostatic loads for any moment you were not in the optimal BMCL position contributed to CO2 buildup. FWIW, I'm not a fan of BMCLs for the further reason that adding and dumping diluent from them requires reaching down/behind to locate the right button and the pull dump cord. Whereas with OTS all manual diluent adding and dumping merely involves reaching for your chest with your whole hand, any part of which can actuate the valves, easily, even at the same time. Ergonomically, it's faster and more intuitive. This feature almost certainly saved me from expansion injury during several dives where I experienced strong up/down currents. And if one is teetering on the brink of a CO2 hit, any inefficiency in clearing the loop could be a factor.

    OTS are less popular with wreck and cave CCR divers because of the chest clutter issue. But their lower WOB in most positions and manual dump/add ease of use are far more important to me...
    Last edited by silent running; 9th August 2018 at 04:52.

  4. #24
    RBW Member TCVA is an unknown quantity at this point TCVA's Avatar
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    Re: Hypercapnia lessons learned

    Just to be clear, Iím not saying the partial scrubber is the root cause of the issues I had that day. What I am saying is that it certainly didnít help.

    I fully concur that there were multiple issues snowballing into s near miss.

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