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Thread: Medication against oxygen posoning?

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    RBW Member Anthony Appleyard is an unknown quantity at this point Anthony Appleyard's Avatar
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    Medication against oxygen posoning?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxygen_toxicity

    Has anyone yet found a medication to suppress divers' oxygen poisoning to pressures significantly deeper than the usual advised limit for diving with pure oxygen?

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    RBW Member dreamdive has disabled reputation dreamdive's Avatar
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    Re: Medication against oxygen posoning?

    No - the only PRELIMINARY evidence for increasing your seizure threshold is being ketotic.

    http://www.trero.org/single-post/201...-of-Prevention

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    RBW Member stranamore is an unknown quantity at this point stranamore's Avatar
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    Re: Medication against oxygen posoning?

    no need to be on a ketogenic diet, several known antiepileptic drugs should work as well->
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28057450
    however there are no studies in humans and in "in water conditions"

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    RBW Member dreamdive has disabled reputation dreamdive's Avatar
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    Re: Medication against oxygen posoning?

    Unlike anti-epileptic drugs, ketosis does not appear to have an adverse effect when diving:

    Commonly reported side effects of carbamazepine include: ataxia, dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, and vomiting. Other side effects include: pruritus, speech disturbance, amblyopia, and xerostomia

    Common side effects of gabapentin include:
    Sleepiness.
    Dizziness.
    Fatigue.
    Clumsiness while walking.
    Visual changes, including double vision.
    Tremor.

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    RBW Member EOD is an unknown quantity at this point EOD's Avatar
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    Re: Medication against oxygen posoning?

    Claudia, wasn't there some research that showed antioxidant (vitamin e?) Consumption prior to o2 exposure also helped? What do you guy take prior to dives?

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    Re: Medication against oxygen posoning?

    Quote Originally Posted by dreamdive  View Original Post
    Unlike anti-epileptic drugs, ketosis does not appear to have an adverse effect when diving:
    One thing to bear in mind with ketosis is the brain fog that accompanies it. Anecdotally pretty common. I've never dived whilst on a ketogenic diet but used it when training for other sports. My brain turns to mush for a good couple of weeks. Like I would not know why I was in a room at home, forgetting where the light switches are, getting lost while driving, etc. First time it happened was worrying, I thought it might've been CTE or similar catching me up until I did some reading on keto diets.

    It would make me very wary to dive, especially on a rebreather, whilst in that adaptation phase. Doesn't happen to everyone but isn't uncommon either. Something to bear in mind if you go down the keto route.

    I vaguely remember some Israeli research suggesting mild heat shock reduced the likelihood of a tox but can't recall the details.

    Sent from my D6603 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by lizardland; 10th April 2017 at 09:19.

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    RBW Member dreamdive has disabled reputation dreamdive's Avatar
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    Re: Medication against oxygen posoning?

    Quote Originally Posted by EOD  View Original Post
    Claudia, wasn't there some research that showed antioxidant (vitamin e?) Consumption prior to o2 exposure also helped? What do you guy take prior to dives?


    You would think by adding antioxidants it will counteract reactive oxygen species that have been associated with oxygen seizures.


    In the following study:


    Oury TD, Ho YS, Piantadosi CA, Crapo JD – Extracellular superoxide dismutase, nitric oxide, and


    central nervous system O2 toxicity


    PNAS 1992; 89: 9715-19


    Superoxide dismutase, a powerful antioxidant, actually showed to be increasing seizure activity in mice.


    I don't know of other studies involving Vit E with regards to oxygen toxicity. Studies with Vit E and C were conducted to see if there was an effect on DCS. The latest one by Thom et al, showed a reduction of micro-particles (Note: not the same as micro-nuclei).


    Without any human study, the only thing that we did for our long dives was entering Ketosis. Although I had no seizures with a high CNS clock, I cannot say if ketosis was advantageous. Until somebody does human trials, we will not know.

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    RBW Member dreamdive has disabled reputation dreamdive's Avatar
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    Re: Medication against oxygen posoning?

    Quote Originally Posted by lizardland  View Original Post
    One thing to bear in mind with ketosis is the brain fog that accompanies it. Anecdotally pretty common. I've never dived whilst on a ketogenic diet but used it when training for other sports. My brain turns to mush for a good couple of weeks. Like I would not know why I was in a room at home, forgetting where the light switches are, getting lost while driving, etc. First time it happened was worrying, I thought it might've been CTE or similar catching me up until I did some reading on keto diets.

    It would make me very wary to dive, especially on a rebreather, whilst in that adaptation phase. Doesn't happen to everyone but isn't uncommon either. Something to bear in mind if you go down the keto route.

    I vaguely remember some Israeli research suggesting mild heat shock reduced the likelihood of a tox but can't recall the details.

    Sent from my D6603 using Tapatalk


    Interesting. Both Peter and I, as well as other friends of ours have not complained about "fogging" after you have established Ketosis.


    Initially, when making the transition between using Glucose and Ketones for metabolic energy supply, one can feel "foggy" and even have much less energy during aerobic activity. I found that it resolves over time. Magnesium supplementation helps with some of that, as well.

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    RBW Member Anthony Appleyard is an unknown quantity at this point Anthony Appleyard's Avatar
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    Re: Medication against oxygen posoning?

    That paper seems to be at this link:-

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1329105

    In the following study:

    Oury TD, Ho YS, Piantadosi CA, Crapo JD – Extracellular superoxide dismutase, nitric oxide, and
    central nervous system O2 toxicity
    PNAS 1992; 89: 9715-19

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    Re: Medication against oxygen posoning?

    There are no proven medications to reduce O2 tox currently. Many do, however, increase the risk...




    Side effects of anti-epileptics could be a problem, and many would not be expected to reduce O2 seizures. (Different mechanism from epilepsy.)




    Stay inside the limits and use a FFM for in-water recompression strategies.




    Please also keep in mind when looking at these studies that O2 exposure in the chamber (depth and time) is known to be different from exposure during immersion.




    If you aren't truly at the expedition level, staying within the NOAA limits is sound advice....if you are at the expedition level, then additional strategies to mitigate exposure risk (like in-water habitats) are available.




    Stay safe,


    -Richard

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