Mike Young and the KISS Rebreather Team will be making the trip south to the Add Helium Training Center on August 22-24, for a weekend of free learning, and fun. All presentation are at no cost to you.

In some classes, seats are limited. All presentations are free. You may attend one presentation, or all of them, hover you must register for each presentation you wish to attend, so we may keep an accurate head count. Please register using the links below, via email at info@addhelium.com, or by calling our office at 239-300-0913. Thanks and we look forward to seeing you!

Schedule of events:

Thursday August 21

7:00 PM to 9:00 PM - Intro to Rebreathers (Tony Land) * * *Reserve your seat


For those considering purchasing a rebreather, or for those simply looking to learn more about the technology, this presentation is for the diver who has little to no knowledge of rebreathers. Discussed will be a basic overview of what a rebreather is, how it works, different rebreather features, and what they mean. Also discussed are things to know and consider when making your first rebreather purchase.


Friday August 22

7:00 PM to 9:00 PM - The Crazy Things We Do (Mike Young) * * Reserve your seat


A great presentation by Mike Young with photos, video clips and incredible stories of the extreme lengths Mike Young and his dive team go to to explore the smallest of caves around the world. Those who are claustrophobic use extreme caution when attending*this lecture!


Saturday August 23

9:00 AM to Noon - KISS Hands-On Demo (Mike Young) * * Reserve your seat


A hands on demo with KISS Rebreathers owner Mike Young for all KISS Rebreathers. Learn about design philosophy, proper technique, and all the ins-and outs from the design expert himself.


2:00 PM to 4:00 PM - History of KISS Rebreathers (Mike Young) * * Reserve your seat


A history of the KISS Rebreathers, who Mike Young is, where the company is going.


6:00 PM to 8:00 PM - The Truth About CO2*(Claudia Roussos, MD) * * Reserve your seat


During our initial dive training, we get introduced to nitrogen causing narcosis. As we advance to nitrox, we learn about oxygen toxicity. In our deco lectures, we learn how nitrogen affects decompression. But, where in our training do we learn about CO2? What is it? How does it affect us? And, can we just keep blaming our scrubbers when we get a CO2 hit? Learn about the gas we generate, that can incapacitate and kill us diving.


Sunday August 24

8:00 AM to 1:00 PM - Dive with KISS Rebreather Team (Odysssey Charters) * * Book your dive


Join the KISS Dive Team, along with Add Helium, Pompano Dive Center, and Odyssey Charters for a dive on the Hydro Atlantic - one of South Florida's premier dive sites. This wreck was first built in 1905, and accidentally sank in the 1980s while being towed for scrap. Claimed by some as one of the tp 10 wreck dives in the world, she sits just off the coast of Boca Raton in 172 feet of water. This dive is through Odyssey Charters, please call to arrange your spot. Those attending the KISS weekend will get a $10 discount on their charter fee.


3:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Coronary Artery Disease & Diving*(Doug Ebersole, MD) * * Reserve your seat


It is estimated that there are about 3 million certified scuba divers in the United States. A large number of these individuals are middle-aged or older and at risk for coronary artery disease. Cardiovascular disease is the third most common cause of death while diving and remains the principal cause of death in the general population. The development of symptoms of angina, pulmonary edema, or sudden cardiac death underwater carries with it a much higher mortality than would the same event on land. Dr Ebersole will discuss*ways to assess risk in those with or at risk of developing coronary artery disease, and make recommendations to make scuba diving safer.


5:00 PM to 8:00 PM - Understanding Gradient Factors (Peter Sotis) * * Reserve your seat


Most technical divers are at least somewhat familiar with the concept of Gradient Factors. However, more and more recreational divers are utilizing dive computers that, too are running on Gradient Factors. But what do Gradient Factors mean? How does the manipulation of Gradient Factors affect my real world of diving? What makes me safer? Could I be doing something that is actually harmful?