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Thread: Do's and Don'ts for DCS Prevention

  1. #21
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    Re: Do's and Don'ts for DCS Prevention

    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Mitchell  View Original Post
    For example, you might find bacon and eggs banned on your next live-aboard trip!
    Given the dietary habits of most divers, boat crew and captains, I find this highly unlikely.

  2. #22
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    Re: Do's and Don'ts for DCS Prevention

    Quote Originally Posted by dreamdive  View Original Post
    Simon:It would be extremely helpful if I may be able to contact you in the future for questions and feedback on future projects.

    Kind regards,

    Claudia
    Of course Claudia. I will pm you my email address.

    Quote Originally Posted by PSotis
    Simon, Could you please tell us more about the findings from this study. It sounds very interesting.

    Also, are there more studies on this subject regarding thermal exposure and DCS?
    Hello Peter, you have probably figured it out for yourself by now because links have been provided to the study itself and a related presentation. However, the essence of it was that unprotected human subjects exercised at depth (120') in water of precisely controlled temperature in NEDU's ocean simulation facility, and then followed a standard decompression according to a USN schedule after bottom times which varied (IIRC between 30 and 70 min). The temperature exposures were manipulated so that the divers remained in warm water all the time, cold water all the time, warm during bottom time then cold during deco, and cold during bottom time and warm during deco. They found a marked influence of the temperature exposure pattern on the risk of DCS. In particular, being cold during the bottom phase of the dive and warm during deco was the safest state. The opposite (warm during bottom time and cold during deco), which is arguably the closest to what happens to us in open ocean dives, was the worst, and associated with more than 10 times the risk of cold-warm. It is probably a fair summary to suggest that an important message is avoidance of getting cold during decompression if possible. Unfortunately, the safest exposure pattern (cold-warm) is not one that we can easily emulate in normal diving!

    There are other relevant studies, but none that remotely approach the methodologic rigour of the NEDU one.

    Simon M

  3. #23
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    Re: Do's and Don'ts for DCS Prevention

    Hello Peter, you have probably figured it out for yourself by now because links have been provided to the study itself and a related presentation. However, the essence of it was that unprotected human subjects exercised at depth (120') in water of precisely controlled temperature in NEDU's ocean simulation facility, and then followed a standard decompression according to a USN schedule after bottom times which varied (IIRC between 30 and 70 min). The temperature exposures were manipulated so that the divers remained in warm water all the time, cold water all the time, warm during bottom time then cold during deco, and cold during bottom time and warm during deco. They found a marked influence of the temperature exposure pattern on the risk of DCS. In particular, being cold during the bottom phase of the dive and warm during deco was the safest state. The opposite (warm during bottom time and cold during deco), which is arguably the closest to what happens to us in open ocean dives, was the worst, and associated with more than 10 times the risk of cold-warm. It is probably a fair summary to suggest that an important message is avoidance of getting cold during decompression if possible. Unfortunately, the safest exposure pattern (cold-warm) is not one that we can easily emulate in normal diving!

    There are other relevant studies, but none that remotely approach the methodologic rigour of the NEDU one.

    Simon M[/QUOTE]

    Thanks Simon. The video of Neil Pollucks explanation of the study really helped me to understand. Its nice to see studies combining human subjects with immersion. Hopefully, we will see more studies of this kind in the future.

    Peter

  4. #24
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    Future of diving research...

    Quote Originally Posted by PSotis  View Original Post
    Hopefully, we will see more studies of this kind in the future.
    I really hope so too but given the rate at which the senior scientists in the field are getting to retirement and the funding streams that have gone to almost nothing, I fear the days of useful research like this are becoming limited.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rubicon Research Repository Project Page
    In 2002, The Office of Naval Research tasked UHMS with performing a comprehensive analysis of the Navy’s research and development program in Undersea Medicine (1). The panel found that 60% of the young researchers in the field left within less than ten (10) years. Additionally, it was discovered that many of the senior scientists in this arena would retire in the near future (52% retiring in less than 10 years and 96% retiring in less than twenty years). Further, the Navy had not trained any investigators in the previous ten (10) years.
    The bright side is that since funding is getting harder, the competition should allow for the best studies to get funded (Right? I am trying to convince myself and not doing a good job of it...)

    Refs:
    *Quote from Rubicon Research Repository Project Page here
    *Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society. An Assessment Of A National Naval Need For Undersea Research. Office of Naval Research, report in response to 5000 Ser 341/270 20 Feb 02.

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