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Thread: DIY temp stick.

  1. #41
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Thanks for the detailed explanation.

    I have a wide IT background so it all makes sense to me. Is the controller off the shelf then and just programmed like the Arduino stuff I mentioned earlier ?

    I suppose this approach would be easier for the less electronically expert to copy.

  2. #42
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scubascooby  View Original Post
    Thanks for the detailed explanation.

    I have a wide IT background so it all makes sense to me. Is the controller off the shelf then and just programmed like the Arduino stuff I mentioned earlier ?

    I suppose this approach would be easier for the less electronically expert to copy.

    The controller is one of the Basic Stamp2 series, (BS2px, to be specific) made by Parallax. Parallax Home

    They start out about as easy (as this stuff goes) to learn to work with as it gets. They program in a Parallax proprietary version of basic, called PBasic.

    The more advanced stamps in the BS2 group; p, pe, & px have additional commands/capabilities and are faster than the entry level BS2.

    The OWIN/OWOUT commands (one wire in and one wire out) specifically are for "Dallas One Wire" protocol devices. (Dallas One Wire is a communication protocol developed by Dallas Semiconductor, somewhat similar to I2C that allows many devices on a 3 wire bus)

    This program was much easier to write for the Stamp, than it would have been to program a PIC.

    Parallax has a 4 line by 20 character per line (4 X 20) serial display that does have bar graph capability, but I don't have an extra $100 to buy one just for this prototype. maybe eventually, when they go on sale, I'll snag one ...
    4x20 Serial LCD with Keypad Interface


    Darlene

  3. #43
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Sounds like another great job! You should check into the Parallax Propellor chip - very powerful and the SPIN language is fairly easy to learn (free complier too!). It would leave alot more programing space than the Stamp series (I used to use them but always kept running out of space for what I wanted to do). I think I even have a spare propellor development board I could send you if you want to give it a try.

    Bob Sweeney

  4. #44
    Darlene Starr - DIY Diva Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen's Avatar
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Quote Originally Posted by bobmaggi  View Original Post
    Sounds like another great job! You should check into the Parallax Propellor chip - very powerful and the SPIN language is fairly easy to learn (free complier too!). It would leave alot more programing space than the Stamp series (I used to use them but always kept running out of space for what I wanted to do). I think I even have a spare propellor development board I could send you if you want to give it a try.

    Bob Sweeney

    Hi Bob,

    I've looked seriously at going the Prop route for the last year or or two, or, alternatively, going the microchip PIC route. There's pros and cons either way. As it turns out, since I can't afford both, the PIC won.

    I'd still like to give the Prop a go sometime, but I went the PIC route just a few months back and bought some developement kit.

    These guys seem to have a pretty good reputation and similar support forums like Parallax does: mikroElektronika offers pic avr 8051 psoc arm microcontroller development tools compilers books

    I went with the EasyPIC6: EasyPIC6 Development System - PIC Microcontroller Board (tool, programmer,debugger, examples) mikroE
    and the PRO Basic compiler: mikroBasic PRO for PIC 2009 - Basic compiler for PIC microcontroller (tutorial, examples) mikroElektronika
    to start with.

    Maybe Santa will bring me the C compiler.


    Darlene

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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Just followed the link to discover they have a Pascal compiler too. Ooh, that takes me back...

    Great work, green inbound.

  6. #46
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    PICs are great processors, you can find a variety for almost any application.

    I have been using the 12F683 lately as a pre-conditioning unit for my HUD. It takes 3 cell inputs (after running through a op-amp set with a fixed gain of 29-30) and waits for a serial command from the Propellor. Once the signal is recieved it runs 10 seperate ADC cycles on each cell, gets the average for each and sends it back serially to the Prop for further processing and display.

    It works very reliably and quickly, it averages less than 1 second for the cycle. Faster isn't necessarily better when you want to extend battery life!

    I use the PicBasic Pro software for PIC - it compiles to fairly compact code and since this PIC has 2K of memory, memory isn't an issue (I was more going for the fact that the chip is only 8 pins and I didn't need anything more)

    I like the idea of creating a DIY temp-stick. I was looking into the I2C devices and the ones you are using seem to be pretty good. I have plenty of programming space left on my system and I'm already using I2C communications to my memory so it should be fairly easy to program in. Now I just need to get 12 of them.....

    Keep up the good work!

    Bob Sweeney

    Quote Originally Posted by Scuba_Vixen  View Original Post
    Hi Bob,

    I've looked seriously at going the Prop route for the last year or or two, or, alternatively, going the microchip PIC route. There's pros and cons either way. As it turns out, since I can't afford both, the PIC won.

    I'd still like to give the Prop a go sometime, but I went the PIC route just a few months back and bought some developement kit.

    These guys seem to have a pretty good reputation and similar support forums like Parallax does: mikroElektronika offers pic avr 8051 psoc arm microcontroller development tools compilers books

    I went with the EasyPIC6: EasyPIC6 Development System - PIC Microcontroller Board (tool, programmer,debugger, examples) mikroE
    and the PRO Basic compiler: mikroBasic PRO for PIC 2009 - Basic compiler for PIC microcontroller (tutorial, examples) mikroElektronika
    to start with.

    Maybe Santa will bring me the C compiler.


    Darlene

  7. #47
    Darlene Starr - DIY Diva Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen's Avatar
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Quote Originally Posted by bobmaggi  View Original Post
    PICs are great processors, you can find a variety for almost any application.

    ~snip~

    I like the idea of creating a DIY temp-stick. I was looking into the I2C devices and the ones you are using seem to be pretty good. I have plenty of programming space left on my system and I'm already using I2C communications to my memory so it should be fairly easy to program in. Now I just need to get 12 of them.....

    Keep up the good work!

    Bob Sweeney
    Bob,

    I bought 50 of the DS18B20's, If you have that extra Prop dev board you mentioned, I'd be happy to swap 20 of them or so. I can give you the stamp code to querry them for the ROM ID, or stamp code for the working prototype. Alternately, I could put each in small envelope and write the ROM ID on it. That way you'd know if your PIC code was getting correct results.


    Darlene

  8. #48
    Darlene Starr - DIY Diva Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen's Avatar
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    For those that were curious about the ROM ID that's coded into each device at manufacture, here's a pic of a single DS18B20 plugged into the bus cable, with the program that querries the device for the ID running.

    The first pair of hex digits always denote the Family Code. DS18B20s are FC 28, while other versions, DS1820, & DS18S20 are FC 10.

    The second pic shows a plain DS1820 being querried.

    Darlene
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    Last edited by Scuba_Vixen; 22nd November 2009 at 20:17.

  9. #49
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    I just had an idea for a crude display.

    Use a row of red/green leds. This gives 4 options, red, amber, green, off. Although I find amber doesn't work so well underwater.

    The hottest sensor would be red. Any sensor within range 1 of the hottest would be amber and range 2 green. The rest being off.

    It would probably require testing to establish ranges or make it dynamic based on the coldest temp.

    So the bar of leds would show 1 red with amber on each side and green outside that.

    Probably not an original idea.

  10. #50
    Darlene Starr - DIY Diva Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen has a brilliant future Scuba_Vixen's Avatar
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    Re: DIY temp stick.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scubascooby  View Original Post
    I just had an idea for a crude display.

    Use a row of red/green leds. This gives 4 options, red, amber, green, off. Although I find amber doesn't work so well underwater.

    The hottest sensor would be red. Any sensor within range 1 of the hottest would be amber and range 2 green. The rest being off.

    It would probably require testing to establish ranges or make it dynamic based on the coldest temp.

    So the bar of leds would show 1 red with amber on each side and green outside that.

    Probably not an original idea.

    Why would you want a crude display, when a decent display is way easier and requires a small fraction of the battery power?

    The biggest issue with displays like that is that it takes lots of battery power for 10 or more leds, and the number of signal lines just makes a clusterf**k.
    10 leds would be 20 signal lines, plus a common rail, and you'd need driver ICs, as microcontrollers by themselves can't sink or source the kind of current needed for bright displays easily viewed underwater.

    Analog/led are not the prefferred technologies to use for this application.


    Darlene
    Last edited by Scuba_Vixen; 23rd November 2009 at 15:12.

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