+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 21 to 30 of 30

Thread: The formal handing-over of the ship's bell of the HMS Vestal

  1. #21
    RBW Member jamiemac is on a distinguished road jamiemac is on a distinguished road jamiemac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    thailand
    Posts
    92
    inspo

    Re: The formal handing-over of the ship's bell of the HMS Vestal

    [quote=trimix;185000]Its always fun to find a bell or ID a lost ship, Ive been involved with a few discoveries myself - but lets be clear the Navies dont want you disturbing their wrecks and dont want you bringing the bells up.

    I agree 100% + with these sentiments. I just posted a big reply to a member regarding the recent trip to the Gulf of Thailand, where a number of 'artifacts' were brought up - no offense was intended, but I hope as a technical diving community we can be respectful and protective of these rare treasures that only we have the prividelge to be able to see for ourselves.
    The more we take away from the wrecks, the less remains for us and our buddies to see in the future. The 1970's are over, fellas. Leave it on the bottom where it will actually be of value to us all.

    Hello Trimix,

    Let me know if I can help you with any details about the Gulf of Thailand trip. It's already been suggested that as we recovered some artifacts from a maru and some post war frieighters we've also removed items from a wargrave, the USS Lagarto - that's incorrect, I assure you.

    There are good vald points to both sides of the artifact collection debate - my point is that the older wrecks are fast disintegrating into the sand, other wrecks we just won't return to because they're just not interesting - barges containing beer bottles and freighters carrying 1980's batteries. I don't think the historical community would spend any time with these and a porthole or two won't be missed by anyone.

    Once again , though, USS Lagarto is protected , not only by law but by us.

    Jamie Macleod MV Trident

  2. #22
    RBW Member trimix is on a distinguished road trimix is on a distinguished road trimix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Nanaimo, BC, Canada
    Posts
    83
    ISC Megalodon COPIS

    Re: The formal handing-over of the ship's bell of the HMS Vestal

    There are good vald points to both sides of the artifact collection debate - my point is that the older wrecks are fast disintegrating into the sand, other wrecks we just won't return to because they're just not interesting - barges containing beer bottles and freighters carrying 1980's batteries. I don't think the historical community would spend any time with these and a porthole or two won't be missed by anyone.

    Once again , though, USS Lagarto is protected , not only by law but by us.


    Yes I agree there are some wrecks that have no apparent historic significance - but who decides what is significant?
    Locally we have many wrecks that, at time of sinking, were anonymous and unremarkable - coastal freighters, tugs, even barges under tow. But over time (decades) their significance can grow. The Malahat, for example, was a log barge that was eventually tied up near Powell River, BC as a breakwater, where it was left to rot and eventually sink. Remarkable? Not at the time. But in better days the barkentine rigged Malahat was reknowned as the 'mother ship' in the roaring 20's, smuggling thousands of cases of Canadian liquor across to US waters, where cases would be picked up at sea by 'rumrunners' while the Coast Guard tried to stop them...
    It would be a shame to see a historic wreck like this picked clean, so some wag could boast of how he wrestled his prized lump of brass from some wreck in Canada...

    As a charter operator you have a vested interest in ensuring that all the sites you take divers to, have that 'virgin' quality to them - if their condition declines, your potential clients won't be paying you to take them out to see a picked over hulk, rotting in the current- regardless of its historical significance. If I were looking to pay $2000+ to go to Thailand and board the MV Trident, I wanna see something good. I can see the picked over stuff at home, where it's already too late. That 'porthole or two' missed by no one is now gone - thanks to divers a decade ahead of me, their greed has left me and the current generation of divers nothing significant to see, although the wreck itself remains.

    As a charter operator, you and your fellow operators are probably the only real line of defense for these wrecks you visit - please explain to your clients why they should not remove anything from the wrecks, so they understand the permanent damage they do. And if you see 'booty' coming up from the bottom, demand that it goes back - it's just going to rot faster now that it's at the surface, and then it's of value to no one. Military wreck or not, it is theft.

    You say you protect the USS Lagarto - that's great. But the protection should extend to all the sites you visit, not just the contentious ones.

  3. #23
    RBW Member Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    tokyo
    Posts
    4,504

    Re: The formal handing-over of the ship's bell of the HMS Vestal

    Quote Originally Posted by trimix  View Original Post
    Yes I agree there are some wrecks that have no apparent historic significance - but who decides what is significant?
    Locally we have many wrecks that, at time of sinking, were anonymous and unremarkable -
    the huge majority of wrecks are and will always be anonymous and unremarkable -period. Yes there are exceptions - but the huge majority are historically insignificant and no museum in the world would ever want any tat off any of them ever.

    As a charter operator, you and your fellow operators are probably the only real line of defense for these wrecks you visit - please explain to your clients why they should not remove anything from the wrecks,
    This was exactly what Jamie says to anyone who dives the Lagarto - because he respects a) its historical significance, b) its a war grave.

    And if you see 'booty' coming up from the bottom, demand that it goes back - it's just going to rot faster now that it's at the surface,
    nonsense. Wrecks are scrap. Abandoned scrap. over time that scrap will be buried and lost as wrecks collapse and currents spread the contents. whats romantic or responsible about leaving it there where nobody will ever see it. Wrecks have a finite life, they tend to stand looking relatively intact for decades then suddenly in a short period of time they collapse. The rate of deterioration is fast once it starts. I have seen wrecks that have been standing for 40 years fall apart in a matter of a few years. What is the point in leaving stuff on wrecks that will collapse soon anyway? Other that some misguided romantic ideals.

    You say you protect the USS Lagarto - that's great. But the protection should extend to all the sites you visit, not just the contentious ones.
    The lagarto is a war grave crammed full of the dead bodies of her courageous crew. A modern steel cargo boat is just a modern steel cargo boat. Not all wrecks are created equally just as not all are historically or in vast majority of cases will ever be historically significant




    I'm diving the Repulse next weekend. Ive dived it probably around 100 times. Never during that time have I felt I didn't enjoy diving it because I didn't see items (such as the bells or stepping plate) because

    1) its a 700foot long 40,000 ton wreck bristling with huge guns and a bell and stepping plate in comparison size wise are nothing
    2) Even if the bell and stepping plate were there chances are high 99.9% of divers would never notice it (because its buried under crap of hidden in dark silty rooms) - as is evident by the fact the last bell was found about 10 years ago and yet hundreds of divers had visited before then (and not seen the bell)


    People (often those that don't do much wreck diving) often have a very rosy idea of what artifacts look like in situ. 99% of the time the average passing diver wouldn't even know that under all that crud and shell growth is anything more than more crud and shell growth.

    IMHO what motivates many divers who complain about salvage is jealousy. They want to see the bells, the telegraphs, helms and portholes. they live in countries where (they think) they can never do that - but this is often not the case. There are heaps of virgin marks off coast of UK just as there are many parts of the world - but somepeople are plain lazy, they expect/want things to be laid out for them. They (unlike people like Jamie, myself, KevinD, the likes of Leigh Bishop and his mates in UK) are prepared to put the effort (financial, time wise and physical) to get off our asses and go looking for virgin wrecks because we too want to see this stuff. If you really want to see this stuff, instead of waiting to be nannied and taken there by the hand why don't you spend the time and money we do and go find it yourself?

    And when you do that (and you find some historically insignificant commercial vessel laying buried under heaps of fishing net at 70m, a vessel in the arse end of nowhere that only you and your mates will ever dive, a vessel that's collapsing. When you enter into the deepest darkest part of that wreck and buried under a mound of silt you find a beautiful piece of porcelain....will you leave it there? Will you put it back into that silt mound where nobody will ever ever see it again, deep in darkest recesses of the wreck in 70m of water. In a room there's a 99% certainty not a single other diver will ever enter (and dig and find that pottery) ?...be honest now :D

    Jamie and his divers would likely take it - as I have little doubt you would

    Maybe you would find a historical WW2 wreck, perhaps even a submarine. Would you report the find immediately to the USN? would you refuse to allow anyone to do any salvage at all on that wreck? would you protect it? would you work with USN to document it, work with the relatives, the museums?

    Just like Jamie and his divers did?


    The point is not all wrecks are created equal. Jamie knows that as does anyone who applies a bit of logic and sense to the discussion.
    A sensible person recognises that fact and recognises that each wreck should be and can be treated seperately according to its status (war grave, historically significant, modern commercial etc)

    Warships remain property of the Military in perpetuity. Not true with non warships that become officially 'abandoned' by their 'owners' (usually insurance companies) unless salvage is undertaken or planned to be undertaken by said owners. So the argument that taking something of all wrecks is thieft is not always true.
    Last edited by Drmike; 7th May 2008 at 04:47.

  4. #24
    PRISM DIVER & LUVIN IT! dive2dive2000 is just really nice dive2dive2000 is just really nice dive2dive2000 is just really nice dive2dive2000 is just really nice dive2dive2000 is just really nice dive2dive2000 is just really nice dive2dive2000 is just really nice dive2dive2000 is just really nice dive2dive2000 is just really nice dive2dive2000 is just really nice dive2dive2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    883

    Re: The formal handing-over of the ship's bell of the HMS Vestal

    Dr Mike,

    kudos very well put
    Last edited by dive2dive2000; 7th May 2008 at 04:44. Reason: spelling

  5. #25
    Dave Tomblin wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Vancouver Island BC Canada
    Posts
    3,787
    Hollis Prism 2, Megalodon

    CCR Instructor Trainer

    Re: The formal handing-over of the ship's bell of the HMS Vestal

    Quote Originally Posted by dive2dive2000  View Original Post
    Dr Mike,

    kudos very well put
    I agree. Good post!
    Cheers,

    Dave....

    www.wedivebc.com

  6. #26
    Submerge Productions PCDiver is a splendid one to behold PCDiver is a splendid one to behold PCDiver is a splendid one to behold PCDiver is a splendid one to behold PCDiver is a splendid one to behold PCDiver is a splendid one to behold PCDiver is a splendid one to behold PCDiver is a splendid one to behold PCDiver is a splendid one to behold PCDiver is a splendid one to behold PCDiver is a splendid one to behold PCDiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Malta (Rabat)
    Posts
    1,178

    Re: The formal handing-over of the ship's bell of the HMS Vestal

    A true wreck diver speaking! Great post Mike. Don't you get bored diving the Repulse, again. :D

  7. #27
    Chris Miller undrh2o is a jewel in the rough undrh2o is a jewel in the rough undrh2o is a jewel in the rough undrh2o is a jewel in the rough undrh2o is a jewel in the rough undrh2o is a jewel in the rough undrh2o is a jewel in the rough undrh2o's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    389
    Dolphin (Atlantis)

    IDA-71

    Re: The formal handing-over of the ship's bell of the HMS Vestal

    Quote Originally Posted by Drmike  View Original Post
    The point is not all wrecks are created equal. Jamie knows that as does anyone who applies a bit of logic and sense to the discussion.
    A sensible person recognises that fact and recognises that each wreck should be and can be treated seperately according to its status (war grave, historically significant, modern commercial etc)
    I'm on the fence on the whole artifact recovery issue is see reasons on both sides so I have no axe to grind here.
    Strangely I do see a contradiction in some of the debate with respect to war graves surely some of the most boring commercial freighters could be the final resting place of some of her crew - surely those lost souls deserve similar respect as to that given to military personnel. Or even the family of the crew would like to know where their loved ones met their fate.
    Am I wrong?

    The wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald in the great lakes is one such wreck that has gotten lots of debate. Although at the depth she rests, she is out of the reach of all but the most technical of technical divers. Initially the families sought closure due to her location not being known - once she was found - the families didn't want anyone diving the site as it is the grave of their loved ones. The bell was recovered and put in a maritime museum for the families to have a place to grieve but even that was not agreed to by all.

  8. #28
    Still Searching matt_reed is an unknown quantity at this point matt_reed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    The Land of Confusion
    Posts
    141
    Pelagian

    Re: The formal handing-over of the ship's bell of the HMS Vestal

    Crikey! 3 people agreeing with Mike in one page...it must be a special day! :D

  9. #29
    RBW Member Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike has a reputation beyond repute Drmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    tokyo
    Posts
    4,504

    Re: The formal handing-over of the ship's bell of the HMS Vestal

    Quote Originally Posted by matt_reed  View Original Post
    Crikey! 3 people agreeing with Mike in one page...it must be a special day! :D
    I know...its just all wrong:D


    better post something quick to retain balance, or even I might start believing my crap :D LOL!

    .
    PS can you email/pm the link to the photos we took at your place?

  10. #30
    RBW Member KevinD is an unknown quantity at this point KevinD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    (No longer) west of Woodstock, south of Vietnam.
    Posts
    36
    Mk15.5

    Re: The formal handing-over of the ship's bell of the HMS Vestal

    Mikey mate, you are waxing lyrical, and quite eloquent old chap!

    Quote Originally Posted by undrh2o  View Original Post
    The wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald in the great lakes is one such wreck that has gotten lots of debate. Although at the depth she rests, she is out of the reach of all but the most technical of technical divers.
    Given the reference to the above wreck I would like to just make mention of what I have always considered to be one of the great unsung wreck dives of the last, errr, well, err, well since so called 'technical' diving began. And that has to be Terrence N Tysall's and The Crazy (no offence meant) Russian's (Mike Zee) dive on the Fitz on 1st Sept 1995 to 161m/528ft on OC. As you may know, Lake Superior, at the best of times, is not all that warm, so that was quite a feat. Quite a feat! And although the bottom time may not have been long compared to todays 'standards', it was not just a 'touch and go' to say "I was there" either, and while supported ably and safely, was done so minimumly and without fuss. (Unlike some peoples dives, even now. And surprise surprise, they even came back and told the truth about it. How old fashioned.)

    As a matter of fact TNT racked up a few pretty big 'remote location' dives (for that time period) on OC that year; a 120m/400ft+ series in the Blue Hole off Belize (IIRC Matt?) which was no 'touch and go' either, and then a mere 110m/360ft in November of the same year for the first scuba dive (Bob Ballard had 'dived' there previously in a submersible) on the USS Atlanta off Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands. Again, no bounce there either.

    Not a bad effort back then, and I think in the space of three months, if you ask me.

    PS. Just a clarification so no misunderstanding. Re USS Atlanta; It was not untill 1997 that TNT and I went back to Atlanta and made some video survey dives on her to her max depth of 131m/430ft. As stated, that first visit in 95 was just to 110m/360ft.

    K.
    Last edited by KevinD; 10th May 2008 at 22:20. Reason: Typo /clarification

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts