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Thread: CCR Cave Training In Mexico with ProTec

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    So many CCR So little etc Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase has a reputation beyond repute Mark Chase's Avatar
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    JJ Hybrid

    Inspo, Hammer Head, KISS rEvo

    CCR Cave Training In Mexico with ProTec

    IANTD CCR Full Cave Mexico 2008

    OK, we made a few mistakes from the off.

    Mistake number one was taking family along for the trip. The hotel needed to be perfection to keep my wife and kids happy and the Sandos Caricol Beach resort and Spa wasnít even close. Howardís luxury room was in outer Mongolia about three days hike from the nearest civilisation and my sea view room (a must have for Mrs C) offered a sea view if you stood on tippy toes and lent 49 degrees to the right whilst hanging out of the bedroom window.

    But hey ho the hotel its self wasnít bad and the beach looked fantastic. Unnnnnnnnlesss that was, you wanted to go in the sea.

    The sea off the beach was about half a meter deep all the way out some 30m from shore and having waded trough the seaweed soup you then had to negotiate an assault coarse of razor sharp rocks and ankle breaking crevices. The viz in the water close in was about as good a Dover on a bad day. Further out it increased to about 2m viz and depth before you hit the man made concrete blocks that stopped the waves nicking the sand off the beech.

    Basically it sucked and my wife was very very pissed off. Having a pissed off wife even before I disappeared for seven days diving was just was like knowing in your heart your going to die even before the diagnosis from the doctor.

    In a vain attempt to inject some positive vibe back in to the trip, I instigated a swimming with dolphins day for the family and suggested to Ling a room upgrade was in order, dash the expense. Swimming with dolphins was mega cool. However, Howard managed to get a bollocking for taking Sue on a small boat to get there and I got a bollocking for spending too much money.

    Our car for the fortnight was a VW estate with a laughable 75,000Km on the clock. More like 750,000 if you ask my opinion. The gear box was a lottery game where you pointed the stick in the general direction of what you hoped was forth and then eased gently off the clutch in case you had grabbed second or possibly reverse by mistake. The steering wheel was at 45 degrees when driving in a straight line and the front left suspension was so bad I dare not look at the engine fluid levels unless I should find the suspension strut was only held in place by the bonnet. (hood to you yanks)

    So an ideal dive wagon

    A dry run with Janos on the Friday had shown me the location of the dive centre and demonstrated the M25esk traffic conditions we were likely to expect on the day. Janos had opted for cheep and convenient and was staying at Mamaís Hotel in Playa where the dive centre was located.

    This was big mistake No2.

    8.00am Saturday and day one, we are in the classroom with a hint of a possible dive in the PM following some lectures. There then followed an introduction session. Our instructor was one Andreas W Matthes (Matt Mexico). Matt turned out to be a bear of a man, who surprised me by being of Germanic origin. (For some strange reason I thought he was American). He was to be ably assisted by Patrick the Austrian Underling. Patrick was to be running the lectures, dives and debriefs under the watchful gaze of Matt and in doing so furthering his own goal of becoming a cave instructor.

    I knew Matt was a good instructor and heíd come highly recommended but over the next few days I was to discover that in fact he is not just good but is one of the most accomplished cave divers in the Yucatan. I also discovered he doesnít suffer fools gladly.

    Patrick was an instant hit with me. His presentation stile humour combined with short sharp shock tactics, was right up my street. He also has one of the best hand signal / facial combinations I have ever seen. A handy tool set for raising a smile as he grinds your diving ego into dust.

    The day whizzed by and we were soon aware thereíd be no diving and a little anticlimax began to sink in. Ho Hum, kit rigged and sorted we were all ready for an early go on day two.

    Things we learned on day one aside from the planned syllabus:

    1. Wet notes are essential to the course
    2. You must have a copy of the IANTD wet tables.
    3. On the KISS and Inspo youíre only allowed to plan on a max scrubber duration of three hours.
    4. A 2m long hose is required on the bailout stage.

    I had to buy new tables, which was annoying as I have them at home. Computer diving (wet or dry) or deco on the fly was not allowed.

    DAY 2

    Following Mattís truck to the dive site is a test of skill and bravery. I managed to find the full limits of the VWs power, handling, suspension and breaking capability before we were half way to the site. A pretty amazing achievement on a straight road.

    Eden is lovely. A large open cenote with a small upstream entrance to the back and a large down stream entrance to the side. Having kitted up it was weight check time and for Howard and me a bit of a shock.

    BIG mistake No3

    I had tested my rig with a base layer and my new membrane suit using the 5.5Kg SS counter lung case and found it to be massively overweight. So before the trip I replaced it with the 2kg standard ali frame. I was also using ali tanks so I expected to be very buoyant. In the 6c lakes of England I hadnít had a chance for a lot of testing with a membrane and just a base layer but I was sure loosing 3kg would do the job.

    With no weight on at all I still sank like a rock.

    Worse still I was an arse heavy rock and I needed lead top side to trim. Iíd soldier on today without, but it was hard graft. Howard was also massively arse heavy and only Janos seemed confident with his weighting and rig. Despite being over weight I had to put a further 2kg on top of the unit to trim out.

    We were introduced to the concept of dive planning a cave and pre-dive checks involving Bubble checks, S drills, top to bottom kit checks, CCR thirds planning and limitations on CNS deco and bailout. Bailout was to prove an issue as we were using single ali 80s blown to 200bar with air. One of the team had a RMV close to that of a sexually aroused hippo and as a result our 30lpm gas plan limited us to a max 30min penetration time. Matt later said the highest RMV heíd ever planed with a student before was 22lpm.

    Pre Dive Breefing



    Patrick laid a line circuit in open water with short runs between tie offs and soon the fun was to start.

    A few laps to familiarise our selves with the tight up and down circuit in max 5m of water and the skills began with mask off circuits with hands circling the line. Blind and stressed by having water up your nose you quickly found your legs whacked with a back up torch if they hit the bottom and the line slapped out of your hand if your loose OK was not an iron strong loop.

    Soon entanglement was added to the equation and some very nasty triple wrapped torch heads and tank valves were to follow. I was flitting between laughing my head off and calling the instructors SOBís but once the drill was over I opened my eyes to find the Dude sporting only one fin and considered actually Iíd got of lightly.

    Blind contact exit drill followed and we couldnít have been much worse at it if we tried. I just couldnít see it working in a proper stressed environment and I could see divers doing solo exits as being safer, more efficient and more likely to actually happen. Pointing this out to Matt got me my first serious knuckle wrap on the course.

    Change your attitude fast or get your ego out of my cave

    Having spent hours in open water thrashing out skills Matt invited us to actually enter the cavern section of the cave for the first time. Excitement mounted and plans were carefully drawn up and soon we were about to touch the outskirts of a Mexican cave for the first timeÖ..

    And then???



    Bleep Bleep Bleep Bleep


    Yep, a Classic Inspo cell error hits us about 5m into the mouth of the cavern. Howard is mortified and Janos and I console him but secretly we wish he was diving one of our infallible KISS units.

    Diving over its back to the shop and prep for tomorrow.


    DAY 3 Eden

    We are to dive the upstream cave. Mind you the current is virtually non existent so this is hardly a chore. Every dive starts with a bubble check, S Drill, full top to toe kit check limitations assessment and dive planning. We are to enter the cave and proceed to our turn limit then we are warned that upon the exit we must expect a drill. Today it will be a touch contact exit.

    We enter the Mexican cave world for the first time having made our primary tie off in open water and secondary in the overhead we connect too and follow the gold line. The visibility is epic. Only the meeting of salt water and fresh (resulting in an oily halocline) and our own poor fining technique reduce the viz. Apart from that it has an air like quality that makes you wonder why we need independent breathing gas at all.

    Team Chaos Venture forth



    Howard ties in the primary Janos provides the light and i as lucky No 3 just watch



    All too soon the dive is turned, well before limits, and we are signalled to the line, eyes closed and torches off. I am in the middle and I acquire Howardís arm and wait for Janos. I was dreading the drill following our poor performance in open water.

    Much to our surprise it was easy. The distance between wraps in the cave was massive so we could get a fair pace on before having to stop and identify the direction of travel by touch. We made good order back to the primary reel and a tap on the head signalled drill over.

    Eyes open and feeling smug I noticed Howard ahead exiting the cave whilst Janos behind was undoing the primary reel from the main line. I went forward to signal Howard to stop and then turned to find Janos heading my way fast with no regulator in his mouth. I went for my reg then my mask was off and Id had my BOV switched to OC. Buoyancy went to crap so I just dumped everything and went for the comfort of the cave floor. Once my mask was back on I found viz was very bad. I went on the line and awaited Janos for touch contact and we exited the cave together.

    Howard was watching all this from the primary tie and said it was most amusing.

    Major bollockings were to follow.

    And so it went on for the next couple of days in Taj Mahal. Team awareness was crap, buoyancy was crap, and situational awareness was crap. The situation right now was ignored as we became fixated on the next drill. Once a drill had ended we had all relaxed and protocols were forgotten completely. Janos seemed to want to lead the dive no matter what his position in the team with constant interruptions and light signals. Howard was focused 80% on buoyancy and 20% on the dive and these interruptions would send him over the edge. I was struggling with trim and buoyancy whilst trying to not react intuitively with an open water response to a cave situation and desperately trying to remember all the instructions. I also made the same mistake of interrupting the flow of the dive when in fact the problem was minor or insignificant.

    The Haloclines were amazing:



    With our bailout gas limitation we really didnít have enough time to get the planned dives finished. We had between us 5 X Ali 80s with 200bar in and we were diving in 40m+ viz. A reduction of Sac or team bailout was discussed but one team member rejected it. Obviously we had to go with this decision without further discussion but I was getting very concerned we werenít getting the time in on each dive plan. Mind you, it easy for me to say just extend it, because Iíd get an hour out of an ali 80 at that depth and we were limited to 30mins

    The stress levels were growing and Janos lost his temper with me once or twice. I reacted badly to this. Under normal circumstances I donít give a toss who leads the dive but on the course we couldnít work like that. Howardís lovely personality was the only buffer between Janos and I beating the living crap out of each other.

    Being in separate hotels didnít help. Howard and I were together all the time and we only met Janos under dive conditions. We couldnít do much about this we had familyís to consider. Janos was working to a budget and wouldnít come to our hotel for meals and frankly this was good as our wives didnít want us talking diving all night as well as doing it all day. My wife wasnít going to let me pay out for food and drink for a family of four in a restaurant when it was all free at my hotel. Janos could get a pass for free food and drink all night for $40. Frankly it would have been cheaper for me to pay for him. End result was post dive team meetings were non existent.

    It was reaching a head so after a particularly bad dive Janos and I had a heart to heart and tried to patch thing up. Course or no course I wasnít going to fall out and lose a valued friend.

    Check out the credits on the maps if your out there. Matt has maped a lot of cave.



    The dives were getting more and more complex. It felt like we had just debriefed the last screw up and we were then faced with the next even more challenging level of diving. Jumps and complex navigation were thrown into the equation and all the time the drills continued relentlessly.

    Then we came to the drill I was dreading. The lost line drill. Divers were taken blind one at a time off the line and instructed to carry out a line search in pitch black using a safety spool. If there was any drill that was going to freak me out, this was it.

    Attempt one was aborted when we found a rock had collapsed on our line. This needed to be repaired and it was above our pay grade so we had to abort the dive. Once more we were berated for damaging the viz and poor team communication but we were angry at this because we had reacted in the correct way to a situation even Matt and Patrick didnít notice. We communicated a tricky situation and decided the best course of action and all felt a little praise for getting the important bit right would not have gone amiss

    Attempt two involved Matt repairing the permanent line on the way in.

    I was third and I waited on the line as Howard and Janos completed their skill. Then it was my turn. The lost line drill involves crawling on the floor of the cave and with two drills completed viz was poor to say the least. I was lead off the line eyes shut and I tried to focus on the task. My internal sat nav was amazingly good and I was well aware of the lefts and rights of our journey. My confidence was growing.

    I was placed on a primary tie location and set to work. Spool out I unclipped the line and set about the primary tie. I had forgotten to clip off the bolt snap which of course I then dropped. I found it easily and clipped it off but I was already cursing. I searched desperately for a secondary tie off and couldnít find a thing within arms reach. It made me laugh to think when I was following I could always see 100s of wraps and tie off but as soon as the reel / spool was in my hand they all dissolved into featureless blobs in the wrong place and pointing the wrong way.

    A tap on the head told me I had failed. A thumbed dive told me I had failed badly. I went to retrieve my spool but a second angry thumb reminded me to leave all equipment in the cave and get out immediately. So I despondently left my spool in place and set off with Patrick through some appalling viz back to the line for a touch contact exit.

    I was gutted. I had screwed up and done things badly on the course but I had never failed to complete a task. I took great pride in my ability to get it done without panic and under stress. It wasnít pretty but it was job done and now I had just plain failed. I felt awful but not as awful as I was about to feel.

    It wasnít me at all. Howard had run out of diluent and didnít notice till it was too late due to the appalling viz. This obviously caused Matt to do a full on air emergency thumbing of the dive. He communicated this to Patrick who ended my drill with a thumb and all I could think about was how I, the mighty veteran of 20years diving could have screwed up. My focus on the team exit was not 100% I was 25% focused on feeling sorry for me.

    This screw up was far far worse than anything else I had done so far and was to be a mental turning point. We had to focus on the simple stuff. The team and team awareness. Screwing up this simple stuff was unforgivable.

    Diving was over for the day.



    The next day we re entered the cave with me leading. Primary ties reel and jumps line in, we head for the lost line drill position. I am taken off the line to the primary tie and this time I do a better job of deploying the safety spool. My buoyancy is so good today I am hovering six inches off the floor and working when I suddenly remember I should for once be on the deck so I dump and go down.

    Again the secondary is evading me but this time I find a spot and manage to tie in. I feel the line to get a direction off my primary and secondary and I turn in stages to head off in search of the gold line.

    Then I hit a rock. I attempt a two step pan to the right and this doesnít clear it, so its decision time. I knew there was a very large rock to what I believed to be the right of my position. I had noticed this on my entrance to the cave and this had to be it. I must have moved off too far to the right. I decided to wind back in to my secondary and try again. A smart move as my new heading sent me directly to the line. I had finished the drill I thought would be my biggest challenge and I felt good but I didnít let the lessons of yesterday be forgotten and I took a moment to check out Howard and Janos to make sure they were OK before setting off with Patrick to retrieve my spool plus the one I left in yesterday.

    With a torch on I could now see many secondary ties and I just couldnít imagine why I found it so hard to find one when I needed it.

    Once again drills and skills followed including a blind exit. I had been suffering from water in the loop the whole dive. My normal rolling to the side clearance on the Kiss was not proving sufficient and I had to do two or three mouthpiece out loop clearance drills. Once I did this whilst holding on to Howard and not holding the line as I had been instructed. Patrick found my blind OK signal most amusing seeing as I had broken protocol and could have lost the line.

    Drill over I recovered the jump spool and made it back to the main cavern circuit. Then we made it to the primary reel and I started to detach it and reel in. In doing so I went head down and I got a taste of sofnalime and water on my tongue and lips.

    At first it was bearable but I lost buoyancy a bit and the line went slack. I tried to recover the slack line but I got a second taste and this time my lips were on fire and my tongue was burning. I bailed out on the BOV to OC and flooded the reg to wash out my mouth. My lips were burning my eyes were watering badly. Buoyancy was bad but at least it was on the neg side and but I thought thatís it, I am thumbing this right now.

    I tightened the line and dumped the reel by the secondary whilst flashing Howard. He turned and I thumbed the dive whilst pointing to my BOV on OC. Howard gave the OK but didnít seem to be in any kind of hurry to exit so I flashed him again and vigorously thumbed it again. Howard got the message but I thought that Janos was refusing to exit because he wanted a three min safety stop.

    I got in his face looked him in the eye and thumbed it again and he didnít appear happy but eventually agreed to a slow ascent. Once out, I spat the loop rinsed my mouth and rinsed the BOV as best I could. My lips were still on fire and my tongue was burning but it was no where near as bad as it could have been.

    In the debrief Janos said that he hadnít seen my first thumb, and didnít realise I had a problem or that I was on OC until I signalled to skip the safety stop. Despite the caustic cocktail event, he felt we should still have done a three min stop. I strongly disagreed. The caustic cocktail could have destroyed my cells and destroyed my BOV. It would have ended the Mexico trip there and then on that dive.

    We had done 50mins at an average depth of 10m on a set point of 1.0 equivalent of 50% nitrox, we were an hour away from any real deco commitment and even comfortably inside our ultra conservative NDLs for the dive. With our ballistic 1.3m/min ascent rate (I down loaded it and checked) I couldnít understand why this was not blatantly obvious. The risk of skipping a three min stop didnít warrant the possible destruction of my unit. Hanging horizontal would have let the caustic liquid into the loop so I needed my unit vertical where the liquid would stay in the bottom of the scrubber and not going to cause damage. I was in the minority it seemed and frankly that astonished me.

    Patric



    Me working the line



    Me on a safety stop





    However that night Janos was a God send as we worked for hours to try and repair what we thought was the problem. KISS ADV diaphragms are seriously crap and it took multiple attempts and Janosís cool head to finally assemble it in a way that didnít leak. I was enormously grateful to Janos for his help and it went a long way to dispelling our earlier disagreements. The following day I discovered a hole in the mouthpiece which could also have caused the flood. I swapped this with my bailout reg and all the dives to follow were nice and dry.

    Howard had punctured his Inspo wing so was now on a new (for him) Halcyon wing with a new dump. All this on top of his existing problems of being so arse heavy he needed 7Kg on top of the CCR to trim out. Being so massively overweight meant his shallow buoyancy was on a knife edge. He was leading the dive and I wanted it to go well for him. Having already interrupted the flow of the dive on many occasions and despite being told he shouldnít, Janos was still doing loads of signals from the back and stopping the dive for every perceived error. When youíre trying to keep stress down and keep the dive moving this is frustrating.

    On this occasion he flashed that the primary was failing and he and I turned to re tie it. Then again he flashed with a problem with the primary stating it was not in open water. I looked up and thought it was borderline but not too bad and tried to get him to continue on to avoid Howard having to retrieve the line and re do it in 1-3m of water. He refused and now I was loosing patience. Then he thumbed the dive and I was exasperated. I drifted up directly above the primary tie but I had to admit he was right. It was way too close to the slope of the cave entrance. It was in open water but you would bang your head on the exit if you went directly up. I had broke ranks to check it out so I got specifically told off for that but more importantly it was a lesson in cry wolf. After so many interruptions I was starting to ignore Janos and that was a mistake.

    The bollocking that followed was intense.

    At this point I could see no chance of us passing the course and I made the mental decision to just try and learn as much as I could and try to enjoy the remaining dives.
    I also had to accept my share of the responsibility for the poor communication with Janos I was always looking at the situation in a sympathetic light with Howard and a negative way with Janos. It was hard for me but I knew it was my own failing and I had to overcome it. ďWhat everĒ was to be my new mantra and I would take all signals very seriously.

    Due to the equipment failure related missed dives and short in water times we needed an extra day in the water. This was disastrous for Howard and I. I considered saying no, but in the end decided it was not often you get the opportunity to have an instructor like Matt analysing your dives.

    I was reasonably confident Ling wouldnít divorce me until the kids got a little older. However the actual telling Ling didnít go well so I am not 100% certain.

    Fridayís dives were complex navigation involving a blind gas sharing exit through a restriction and a journey through the bedding plane that scraped the tanks on your back and the belly of your dry suit over jagged rocks. This to be followed by jumps and an attempt to complete a circuit.

    The dive went OK but we couldnít get through the bedding plane without kicking up the viz badly so the dive was turned there. We headed out and on the return I was told to go out of air. I took the loop out and headed forward to Janos for gas. He was just a couple of fin kicks ahead so it was easy to grab his leg but I forgot the light signal.

    I put the reg in my mouth but Janos forgot to wait till I was holding the hose and he deployed the 2m hose. In doing so he ripped the reg straight back out leaving me with just the mouthpiece in my mouth. I took a breath of water and ignored Patrick's offered reg choosing instead to go for the one on my BOV that I knew was working. Right or wrong this was not the time to have a second issue as I was very very close to being in serious trouble.

    I took a moment to calm down then went back to my position on the line. I was just contemplating life the universe and everything when Howard flashed me from behind and hit me for gas. Fortunately autopilot kicked in and I got him on it without a problem.

    Dive over, day over Howard and I accepted the ear bending we were going to get from our respective partners and we stayed late for an urgent team talk with Janos. The mood was lifted by an exuberant Patrick coming up to announce he had just passed his instructors exam. He defiantly deserved it and our minds slipped to the task of sorting a new name for him as ďUnderlingĒ didnít seem appropriate any more.

    We had two days off to get it all together before the final dives on the Monday.

    I took Ling on a cavern dive on the Saturday and she hated it. It scared her and she bailed out within mins of the dive starting. It seemed I had no chance of doing anything right by my family on this trip but surprisingly the rest of the day went well just chilling out back at the hotel.

    Sunday we were to meet up with Janos and do the sights at Tulim and finish the day at the Xel-Ha park. I had hoped to get time with Howard and Janos for another team talk but Janos decided he didnít want to go to Xel-Ha so it didnít happen.

    Monday came and we kitted up in a sombre mood. We again set off for Chac Mool as planned but all my visualisation of the dive went to waste as the rout we were to dive was changed.

    Janos lead the dive and did a great job with the reels and a better job of noticing me missing during the lost diver drill and then both finding me and getting me back to the line. Despite my issues with his seeming need to control every dive I had to admit he had the strongest skill set in the team. As the supposedly stressed diver I lead the team out and again we were hit with air share and CCR skills on the exit. The halocline reduces viz badly in this location and Patrick demonstrated just how hard this made team communication on the exit by stopping the now thumbed dive and making Janos go back for the reel in the worst place for disturbance. Turning the dive back into the cave was a hard thing to communicate under thumbed status and we had to get right on top of one another to make our hand signals understood. I was signalling question to Janos for why I was getting zero response for my request for an OK and he thought I was thumbing the dive.

    After this little confusion we completed the dive without fuss and Matt debriefed us with only mild comments on areas of improvement.

    Then he hit us with a question. This could have been a trick question to expose our overconfidence and / or arrogance but we all answered the same way.

    He then shook each one of us by the hand and told us we had passed the course.

    There were no shouts of joy, no high fives to be honest all I can remember was a polite thank you from each of us.

    I canít speak for the others but I didnít feel like I had passed anything. I felt I had been given a tool box and a set of instructions. I felt mentally and physically drained by the experience and I didnít think we had performed well at all. However we now had to go away and practice and build on what we had done so far. It will take time and it wonít be easy to do with the limited access to caves we have in the UK but I knew that from that day on I was going to change many aspects of my diving and my thought process related to diving as a team.

    More over I wanted to move forward with Howard and Janos beside me as they would be the only people who could fully appreciate what we needed to achieve and why.

    From this angle it was the right decision to pass us. We had learned what we needed to do and no amount of instruction was going to be of further assistance. We just needed to practice practice practice and build slowly from the excellent knowledge base provided by Patrick and Matt. If we had proved one thing on the whole course it was that no matter what was thrown at us we didnít panic and we kept pushing forward. We all made mistakes and the other members of the team were there to pick up the pieces. We needed each other and despite the pressure and the stress we learned to fully appreciate this fact.

    On one dive where we got a roasting I turned to Matt and Patrick and said I had been diving with Howard for years and Janos for some time and I was 100% confident we would get our sorry arse out of that cave no matter what.

    I wanted to add ďso f##k you ar##holeĒ

    But I didnít think that would help the cause.

    Perhaps they could see this and thatís why we passed? I donít know but I do know I was telling the truth.

    Our final dive together was to be our first proper cave dive without instruction. We took the easy rout to the Cathedral. I lead the dive and Patrick came along but he was just diving for himself and stayed off to one side.

    We tied in and joined the cavern circuit and followed this round to the jump point. A primary reel jump followed and we set off to find the permanent line. Having tied in, this line was then followed to the vast chamber of stalagmites and stalactites that formed the Cathedral. It was a fantastic sight and we cruised slowly through soaking up the magnificent scenery right up till we hit limits on exit gas.

    We could have staid longer as long as we didnít penetrate further inside the cave. Our scrubbers were the only limitation and another ten mins was perfectly doable but despite the splendour I stuck to my plan of taking this cave diving lark slow and easy and I turned the dive.

    An easy exit followed and now for the first time I began to enjoy the fact we had passed. I began to plan a future for our team in my mind and I was dieing to ask the others when we could go cave diving together again.



    I would like to take this opportunity to once again thank Matt and Patrick for the excellent training we received. If you are considering doing a OC or CCR cave course in Mexico then I strongly recommend them. However unless your already a great diver Id warn you to leave your ego at home and that you must be able to take vicious mental and verbal punches to the gut and push on.

    Perhaps if you cant take the heat, best stay out of the kitchen.


    ATB


    Mark Chase

  2. #2
    RBW Member jkaterenchuk has a reputation beyond repute jkaterenchuk has a reputation beyond repute jkaterenchuk has a reputation beyond repute jkaterenchuk has a reputation beyond repute jkaterenchuk has a reputation beyond repute jkaterenchuk has a reputation beyond repute jkaterenchuk has a reputation beyond repute jkaterenchuk has a reputation beyond repute jkaterenchuk has a reputation beyond repute jkaterenchuk has a reputation beyond repute jkaterenchuk has a reputation beyond repute jkaterenchuk's Avatar
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    HammerMeg

    Kiss Classic, Inspiration

    Re: CCR Cave Training In Mexico with ProTec

    Mark and the guys

    Great story and Congrats. Having just finished my CCR cave course last month I felt like I was right there with you.

    John

  3. #3
    Hammerhead CCR diverklondike has a reputation beyond repute diverklondike has a reputation beyond repute diverklondike has a reputation beyond repute diverklondike has a reputation beyond repute diverklondike has a reputation beyond repute diverklondike has a reputation beyond repute diverklondike has a reputation beyond repute diverklondike has a reputation beyond repute diverklondike has a reputation beyond repute diverklondike has a reputation beyond repute diverklondike has a reputation beyond repute diverklondike's Avatar
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    HammerHead CCR

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    Re: CCR Cave Training In Mexico with ProTec

    Mark,

    Great post and report. I think most people go through many of the things that you have shared when they go though their cave training. I know that I certainly did.

    Have some green for coming back alive... :)

    Dive Safe

    Mark

  4. #4
    Ossi gerstl_ossi has much to be proud of gerstl_ossi has much to be proud of gerstl_ossi has much to be proud of gerstl_ossi has much to be proud of gerstl_ossi has much to be proud of gerstl_ossi has much to be proud of gerstl_ossi has much to be proud of gerstl_ossi has much to be proud of gerstl_ossi has much to be proud of gerstl_ossi has much to be proud of gerstl_ossi has much to be proud of gerstl_ossi's Avatar
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    Re: CCR Cave Training In Mexico with ProTec

    Nice report, thanks for sharing and congratulation for the CCR full cave.

    Ossi

  5. #5
    Moderator ScubaDadMiami has much to be proud of ScubaDadMiami has much to be proud of ScubaDadMiami has much to be proud of ScubaDadMiami has much to be proud of ScubaDadMiami has much to be proud of ScubaDadMiami has much to be proud of ScubaDadMiami has much to be proud of ScubaDadMiami has much to be proud of ScubaDadMiami has much to be proud of ScubaDadMiami has much to be proud of ScubaDadMiami has much to be proud of ScubaDadMiami's Avatar
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    Re: CCR Cave Training In Mexico with ProTec

    Congratulations, cave divers all! Your story and transformation certainly brings back some memories. Have some green for sharing your story.

  6. #6
    RBW Member JimBo is an unknown quantity at this point JimBo's Avatar
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    Re: CCR Cave Training In Mexico with ProTec

    Congrats, on the coarse.Nice report and I enjoyed the pics.

  7. #7
    Nailer99 Joshua Smith has much to be proud of Joshua Smith has much to be proud of Joshua Smith has much to be proud of Joshua Smith has much to be proud of Joshua Smith has much to be proud of Joshua Smith has much to be proud of Joshua Smith has much to be proud of Joshua Smith has much to be proud of Joshua Smith has much to be proud of Joshua Smith has much to be proud of Joshua Smith has much to be proud of Joshua Smith's Avatar
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    Re: CCR Cave Training In Mexico with ProTec

    Thank you- I really enjoyed reading that! Your candor and honesty is impressive. Hope your marriage survives the trip!

    Edit- Btw, green sent for the phrase "RMV close to that of a sexually aroused hippo".
    Last edited by Joshua Smith; 1st March 2008 at 23:53. Reason: forgot something

  8. #8
    Diver with a camera vlada is just really nice vlada is just really nice vlada is just really nice vlada is just really nice vlada is just really nice vlada is just really nice vlada is just really nice vlada is just really nice vlada is just really nice vlada's Avatar
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    Re: CCR Cave Training In Mexico with ProTec

    Thanks for the great report. I still need to do my CCR Cave x-over one of these days and from your report it sound like Matt is a good choice.

  9. #9
    Dave Tomblin wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc has a reputation beyond repute wedivebc's Avatar
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    Re: CCR Cave Training In Mexico with ProTec

    Thanks for the report Mark. Well done to all of you.
    Cheers,

    Dave....

    www.wedivebc.com

  10. #10
    Andy Favata CCR-Wrecker has a spectacular aura about CCR-Wrecker has a spectacular aura about CCR-Wrecker has a spectacular aura about CCR-Wrecker has a spectacular aura about CCR-Wrecker has a spectacular aura about CCR-Wrecker's Avatar
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    rEvo

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    Re: CCR Cave Training In Mexico with ProTec

    Great report Mark.
    Congrats to you and your team.

    Andy

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