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Thread: How much CO2 is too much?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeH
    Take a look at the chart again. The number that you are looking at, which shows 719.6 at 1500 feet, is mm of Mercury absolute(mm Hg Abs)....NOT millibars, which is what the VR3 measures in.

    On that chart, to get millibars, take the last column(kPa A) and move the decimal point one to the right. For instance - Sea level pressure is 103.3 kPa, and 1013.3 mb.

    For accurate conversions, use http://www.onlineconversion.com/pressure.htm ..

    Mike
    My mistake, apologies

    Dave T

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Underwaterbear
    ...or you could just remember that over the first 10 000 feet atmospheric pressure lapse rate is about 32 millibars / 1000 ft.

    If they were heading from Bikini to Majuro, technically the aircraft should have been flying at 9500 ft since the flight is south east...but who knows what they do out there
    Very clever. From where I was sitting it looked to be a bit over 9000ft on the altimeter.

    Now amaze me by explaining why heading SE makes a difference

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by abowie
    Very clever. From where I was sitting it looked to be a bit over 9000ft on the altimeter.

    Now amaze me by explaining why heading SE makes a difference
    Don't you docs know anything (galavanting all over the world).
    [(Just joking i don't have a clue either )]
    Would it have anything to do with thermals and directions at different altitudes.
    At one altitude it travels one way at x time of year and at this altitude it travels another direction, therefore if you want to travel SE then try for 9500ft to gain the tailwind.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by abowie
    Very clever. From where I was sitting it looked to be a bit over 9000ft on the altimeter.

    Now amaze me by explaining why heading SE makes a difference
    Hmm...warning

    Most of the flying world chooses cruising altitudes below 10000 feet using what is known as the hemispherical rule. You can google it I'm sure but in a nutshell it means for headings of 000 - 179 deg you fly odd thousands +500, and for 180-359 deg you fly even thousands + 500 It helps keep the tin birds from smacking into each other.

    In some parts they fly the more complex quadrantal rule...but that's just confusing

    Clear as mud

  5. #15
    The amount of CO2 depends on what kind of head you wish to have on the mug. Of course, you could add a bit of nitrogen to your tank such as you do with Guiniess, to get more even bubbles throughout the brew. If all you have in the mug is foam, then you have too much CO2.

    (That is what you mean isn't it?)

  6. #16
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    Re: How much CO2 is too much?

    I tried taking a full breath of about 70% CO2 once, Iwouldn't reccomend it, felt VERY dizzy very quickly, and generally like Sh*t for a minute or so.

    Vaguely remember the hemispheric rule/quadrantal rule from learning to fly a microlite a few years ago - basically designed so that planes flying towards each other are at slightly different levels, seems sensible!

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